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Makeup appropriate for Tweens and Teens


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21 replies to this topic

#Post 1 of 22 OFFLINE   Less is More

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Posted 02 December 2011 - 01:46 PM

Hi there,

I don't have any kids myself, but my friends do and I love them like my own.  We all can remember that awkward age, trying to find your identity and experiment - not sure exactly what you are doing...

I would like to help by supplying a few links for these girls to check out independently, it's better than me trying to give advice directly, and I would also like to purchase makeup as gifts for birthday and Christmas presents.  Preferably makeup that actually comes with tips on how to apply it!

It is disappointing to note just how little is available and how hard it is to find.  Most of the market is focused on adult makeup with assumptions that you know how to use it -- and I am not going to get into the cheap and gaudy stuff.

Lastly, I was even more disappointed in the names for the nailpolish, lipsticks and eye shadows.  As an example, check out "Too Faced".  Do I really need eyeshadow called "lap dance"?  I'm not going to buy it for myself, let alone a young female.  Barbie clothes have turned slutty, and most dolls now feature short skirts and heavy makeup and high heels...I would like to see a trend start that females are attractive with clothing and makeup, without having to look like they can be the main act at the local strip joint.  It's fine if you want to have fun with it and get in touch with your inner call girl once in a while, but I don't see why the market has to be dominated by the notion that women are primarily sex objects.  I'm not being a prude, I'm just sayin' that there is far more to women than that, and it's time we start emphasizing more important aspects and less time promoting male fantasies.  Sure sex sells, but so does a lot of more important things ~ like feeling good about yourself, being pretty and smart and inventive, and progressive.  Let's try and promote makeup with loftier ideals!!!



#Post 2 of 22 OFFLINE   divadoll

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 12:28 AM

I think you have to teach the girls you influence to look past how products are being marketed to see how you would use the product in your own life.  If it does not fit into how you can use it, then don't purchase the item.  You are not doing those girls a favour by shielding them from reality, you need to arm them with good judgement to make good decisions in the future and protect themselves against marketing ploys. 

 

I teach my children that marketing is only to provide you with suggestions of how things can be used and not how products should be used.  If celebrities are marketing the item, would they use it themselves?  The answer is most likely a resounding NO.  


An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile, hoping it will eat him last. - Winston Churchill

#Post 3 of 22 OFFLINE   janetgriselle

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 03:27 AM

My mother actually introduced me to Clinique when I was a teenager and I'm seriously so thankful. None of Clinique's stuff has offensive names, it's for the most part natural looking, and we just talked to one of the women at the counter and she helped show me how to apply makeup. So I'd say if you're looking for something higher end that still looks somewhat natural, Clinique is the way to go. I never really tried drugstore stuff.



#Post 4 of 22 OFFLINE   Tirin

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 05:45 AM

I started with makeup when I was 12, but didn't care about brands or names back then. I know a lot of makeup brands do focus on girls being sexy and actually slutty, which is just stupid. As janetgriselle wrote, Clinique is one of the brands that do not have offensive names on their products. It's also one of the first brands I used too. :) Along with Lily Lolo, who never name their (amazing) products with something like "lap dance" or whatnot, Clinique is what I would recommend to younger teenage girls.

 

It'll probably take maaaany years before I have teenage kids on my own (I'm only 20, lol), but I think it's important to let them experiment with makeup, even if it sometimes makes them look a certain way that a mother wouldn't like. All girls need a phase like that, I think. Either way, they will eventually grow up and learn that "sexy" does not equal beautiful. :) 



#Post 5 of 22 OFFLINE   Mkdblackwell4

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 05:16 PM

I understand. I was a tomboy and knew nothing about makeup or skin care and I did not want to have that makeup line. I came to be a Mary Kay consultant by accident years ago and one of the things I love to do is work with those young girls. Sometimes one on one or in a mom daughter group. Mom's also ask me for this service because the child will listen to me and not them even though we are saying the EXACT same thing. I always prepare moms for this but the end result is they trust me skip the dark heavy black eyeliner, their foundation is matched perfectly and they have a natural look that they can recreate the next day.... I would suggest finding a consultant who will provide this TEACHING opportunity in the PRIVACY of the home and not on display out in the open ( that age group is self conscious enough). Also, check out the Mary Kay mineral eye bundles. It has instructions on the box and has colors put together for blue eyes, green eyes, brown eyes or hazel eyes so you can be sure it will be a look that will enhance the eyes. I was 30 before I knew what I was doing and it was hard. Now of course I focus myntime on learning more to be more helpful. Hope this helped give you some ideas. I have two young girls and haven't crossed this bridge yet but know I will and probably have to call another consultant in because they won't believe me. Haha

#Post 6 of 22 OFFLINE   katana

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 06:05 PM

The majority of makeup and clothing lines are marketed in a "sex sells" sort of way. They indeed play on womens insecurites and like to promote the message that you have to be "sexy" and made up to achieve that.

There are however some makeup brands that aren't as bad as others. Bonnebell for example is great for tweens and teens just starting out with cosmetics. They offer lipbalms, lipglosses, eyeshadow palettes, lip palettes.....etc. without provocitive or indesent sounding names. The colours are fun and the packaging is cute. Covergirl also doesn't sell their makeup in the same way other companies do with poorly named products or advertisments.

It is possible to find makeup that is suitable for young girls, and learning how to apply things properly is part of the fun. You can find an incredible amount of tutorials and how to's online, as well as from beauty company websites themselves.

It does get boring and overwhelming at times how overly sexualized the market directed at women has become, but that seems to be the way it has always been. Not that that makes it right by any means.



#Post 7 of 22 OFFLINE   xoxelizabeth189

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 07:06 PM

You could take them to a counter as their christmas present and have the women there show them and then go ahead and buy a product each for them.

 

Or try Mark cosmetics. They're fairly affordable and they have cute things. I love their hookups because you can take it with you.

 

I'd also recommend the $1 elf eyeshadow and crease brushes. They work really well for someone starting out. Most targets have them.



#Post 8 of 22 OFFLINE   cosmeticsaficionado

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 07:24 PM

Just a thought and maybe you have already been over this, but have you talked to the parents? I have a daughter and would feel a bit like my toes were being stepped on if someone decided to give my daughter makeup and start telling her about what is and is not appropriate (though really that won't happen at this point as I have already allowed her to play with makeup lol). It is up to my husband and I to help guide her.

 

Other than that pretty much any neutral palette would work to start out with.


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#Post 9 of 22 OFFLINE   katana

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 07:55 PM



Originally Posted by internetchick View Post

Just a thought and maybe you have already been over this, but have you talked to the parents? I have a daughter and would feel a bit like my toes were being stepped on if someone decided to give my daughter makeup and start telling her about what is and is not appropriate (though really that won't happen at this point as I have already allowed her to play with makeup lol). It is up to my husband and I to help guide her.

 

Other than that pretty much any neutral palette would work to start out with.



I agree it is up to the parents to discuss and decide what is and is not appropriate but I didn't gather from her post that, that is what she intended to do.

However I completely see how someone wouldn't be comfortable giving a young girl cosmetics with names like "orgasm" "lap dance" "stroke of lust" "deep throat" "pussy galore" "over sexed"....etc.

How about names like Coral, Rose, Taupe.....

The cosmetics with provocative names are geared towards older girls I think.

 



#Post 10 of 22 OFFLINE   cosmeticsaficionado

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 08:07 PM



Originally Posted by katana View Post

I agree it is up to the parents to discuss and decide what is and is not appropriate but I didn't gather from her post that, that is what she intended to do.

However I completely see how someone wouldn't be comfortable giving a young girl cosmetics with names like "orgasm" "lap dance" "stroke of lust" "deep throat" "pussy galore" "over sexed"....etc.

How about names like Coral, Rose, Taupe.....

The cosmetics with provocative names are geared towards older girls I think.

 



 

I don't think she necessarily was (I can tell she has good intentions), but sometimes it can be taken that way. Some people don't really mind, but for others when and how makeup is introduced is a big deal. The parents may have different views than her (for example divadoll sees no reason to avoid the names of products and neither do I, yet the OP does). All I am saying is it is always wise to run things by parents first. Sometimes you never know what will or will not turn out to be a big deal. I prefer to err on the side of caution lol.


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#Post 11 of 22 OFFLINE   katana

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 08:11 PM



Originally Posted by internetchick View Post



 

I don't think she necessarily was (I can tell she has good intentions), but sometimes it can be taken that way. Some people don't really mind, but for others when and how makeup is introduced is a big deal. The parents may have different views than her (for example divadoll sees no reason to avoid the names of products and neither do I, yet the OP does). All I am saying is it is always wise to run things by parents first. Sometimes you never know what will or will not turn out to be a big deal. I prefer to err on the side of caution lol.



Good advice :)

I know myself I want to be the one to introduce makeup to my daughter when she is old enough, however I would avoid giving her cosmetics with certain names.

 

 



#Post 12 of 22 OFFLINE   divadoll

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 08:34 PM

In my response, I am assuming that she had the big OK from the parents.  

 

I've taught my daughter to ignore names and brand labels as they really have no meaning.  I would be concerned that someone else wants to teach my daughter about makeup tho.  I'd feel kinda replaced :(


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#Post 13 of 22 OFFLINE   Katie-Gaslight

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 08:46 PM

attention, attention, we are now moving back in time. all aboard the 1950s express, where concerned parents bought penny brite's because barbie was too sexy. even back then.

 

that is all.



#Post 14 of 22 OFFLINE   divadoll

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 08:48 PM

I'm not doing that... then again, my daughter is only 8.  I know its my job to provide her with the tools to make good judgement, not to shield her from the outside world.
 

Originally Posted by Katie-Gaslight View Post

attention, attention, we are now moving back in time. all aboard the 1950s express, where concerned parents bought penny brite's because barbie was too sexy. even back then.

 

that is all.



 


An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile, hoping it will eat him last. - Winston Churchill

#Post 15 of 22 OFFLINE   katana

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 09:02 PM

Barbie has always been the "sexier" of the dolls, hasnt she? I believe she was created to be that way.

I don't find anything wrong with a barbie doll, and I had a lot of fun playing with them when I was a little girl.

 

Children shouldn't be shielded from the outside world at all, they have to know whats going on and how to navigate their way to making the right decisions.

But I do think there is an appropriate age for some things.

How are you going to explain to a curious young girl the meaning of a name "Orgasm"  "Deep Throat" or "Pussy Galore" I don't think the later was relating to a kitty cat.

There is an age for everything, and that doesn't mean you are shielding your child from the world. Movies have ratings on them not to shield kids but to allow them to experience things at a more appropraite age, when they will have a better understanding.



#Post 16 of 22 ONLINE   zadidoll

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 09:20 PM

Well Barbie was based on a sex doll that was sold to Parisian men.



#Post 17 of 22 OFFLINE   divadoll

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 09:27 PM

Pussy Galore is a character in a James Bond movie, Deep Throat was the name given to the secret informant that provided the information for Watergate.  My daughter looks at the colour and not the name.  I've never flipped over a product and read her a name nor made any importance of it.
 

Originally Posted by katana View Post

Barbie has always been the "sexier" of the dolls, hasnt she? I believe she was created to be that way.

I don't find anything wrong with a barbie doll, and I had a lot of fun playing with them when I was a little girl.

 

Children shouldn't be shielded from the outside world at all, they have to know whats going on and how to navigate their way to making the right decisions.

But I do think there is an appropriate age for some things.

How are you going to explain to a curious young girl the meaning of a name "Orgasm"  "Deep Throat" or "Pussy Galore" I don't think the later was relating to a kitty cat.

There is an age for everything, and that doesn't mean you are shielding your child from the world. Movies have ratings on them not to shield kids but to allow them to experience things at a more appropraite age, when they will have a better understanding.



 


An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile, hoping it will eat him last. - Winston Churchill

#Post 18 of 22 OFFLINE   katana

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 09:28 PM



Originally Posted by zadidoll View Post

Well Barbie was based on a sex doll that was sold to Parisian men.


I remember reading the history of barbie a few years ago, I recall that she was originally a sexified doll sold to adults, before being made into a childrens toy. I can see her roots coming from a shady place, LOL

I don't think shes as bad a role model now a days as Lindsay Lohan, Mikley Cyrus, Britney Spears.... At least girls see barbie as a doll and not dancing and stripping on stage like some young tween celebrity idols.

 

Back to the OP's original question about makeup that is geared towards tweens and teens, Try sticking to drugstore products like Covergirl, Rimmel, Revlon, Bonnebell, Annabelle. (As long as mommy is happy with those purchases) they are colourful, fun, inexpensive and don't have questionable names.
 

 



#Post 19 of 22 OFFLINE   ChemicalMakeup

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 10:10 PM

Barbie's been slutty for all of my living memory, I never thought anything of it as a kid though. The fact that she had DDs, a10 inch waste and a stunning shot of cleavage in any of her outfits didn't cross my mind until I was at least 16. I think boy children may start to notice a bit earlier =) I don't think little girls want Barbie in a business suit or Barbie in a church dress. Skater/punk clothes are conservative and pretty cute, but I don't see the girls who like Barbie also liking skater/punk things. The people who make Barbie have to come up with new outfits for her every year, how many "girly" fun conservative outfits can there be? Then again, I was a kid in the nineties, my idols wore tube tops and spandex...

 

As far as makeup goes though, I hate the names! They drive me insane. It's like if those Barbie shirts had "Slut" written on the front of them. With the clothes, the kid isn't going to even realize that it's slutty, or what the word even means. There are people who aren't slutty but wear revealing clothes and vice versa. But when someone asks me what eyeshadow I'm wearing, I think it gives the wrong impression if I say S&M and Asphyxia by UD. On top of that, being a Christian, I don't like that pretty much every brand has a color named "Sin," and there's even a company called Sinful Colors. Even if you aren't a Christian, the word sin has negative connotations, not positive ones. Unless they're appealing to the world of adulterers and cleptos, why not pick something less offensive? I don't have kids, but if I did I wouldn't buy them makeup with trashy names. If someone else got it for them, I'd return it and pick something else out.

 

As far asking the parent's permission before teaching the girl how to do makeup and getting her some, I think it depends. My mother was a straight up hippy who was very anti-makeup. I wish someone had been there to smuggle some silken taupe into my house and show me what to do with it. Instead I was stuck looking like a straight up geek till I got to college. If the kid's delicate and you're going to get her into trouble, don't do it.



#Post 20 of 22 OFFLINE   katana

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 10:19 PM


Haha, all the Bond women have provokative and sexual sounding names. They made a point of having the women have suggestive sounding names in the novels as well as films. Silly boys, lol.

But I dont think NARS meant the watergate scandal when they named their product, along with Orgasm and Super Orgasm, LoL
 

Originally Posted by divadoll View Post

Pussy Galore is a character in a James Bond movie, Deep Throat was the name given to the secret informant that provided the information for Watergate.  My daughter looks at the colour and not the name.  I've never flipped over a product and read her a name nor made any importance of it.