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Sodium Laureth Sulfate or Ammonium Lauryl Sulfate?


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3 replies to this topic

#Post 1 of 4 OFFLINE   CandRach2

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 12:02 PM

Hey. I'm not sure which ingredient is best. Some say it's Sodium Laureth and some say it's Ammonium Lauryl. I want to buy a new shampoo that will make my hair feel clean, but also soft at the same time. And maybe I don't wash it as good the first time, but it always seems like whenever I wash and blow dry my hair, and then go and wash it and blow dry it again all over, it turns out better. Is there a reason for this? Please help guys! -Rachael

#Post 2 of 4 OFFLINE   janetsbreeze

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 02:04 PM

if you can find a shampoo with neither, it's the very best for your hair. the ammonium lauryl is the harsher one i believe.

#Post 3 of 4 OFFLINE   jessimau

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 05:17 PM

Sodium Lauryl or Laureth Sulfate are the harsher ones. Here's what Paula Begoun (cosmetics cop) has to say: ammonium laureth sulfate. Can be derived from coconut; used primarily as a detergent cleansing agent and is considered to be gentle and effective. See surfactant. ammonium lauryl sulfate. Can be derived from coconut; used primarily as a detergent cleansing agent and is considered to be gentle and effective. See surfactant. sodium lauryl sulfate. There has been a great deal of misinformation about sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) being circulated on the Internet. Used primarily as a detergent cleansing agent SLS can be derived from coconut. Although it is a potent skin irritant it is not toxic or dangerous for skin. In concentrations of 2% to 5%, SLS can cause allergic or sensitizing reactions in lots of people. It is used as a standard in scientific studies to establish irritatancy or sensitizing properties of other ingredients (Sources: European Journal of Dermatology, September-October 2001, pages 416–419; American Journal of Contact Dermatitis, March 2001, pages 28–32; and Skin Pharmacology and Applied Skin Physiology, September-October 2000, pages 246–257). Being a skin irritant, however, is not the same as a link to cancer, which is what erroneous warnings on the Internet are falsely claiming about this ingredient! According to Health Canada, in a press release of February 12, 1999 (www.hc-sc.gc.ca/), “A letter has been circulating the Internet which claims that there is a link between cancer and sodium laureth (or lauryl) sulfate (SLS), an ingredient used in [cosmetics]. Health Canada has looked into the matter and has found no scientific evidence to suggest that SLS causes cancer. It has a history of safe use in Canada. Upon further investigation, it was discovered that this e-mail warning is a hoax. The letter is signed by a person at the University of Pennsylvania Health System and includes a phone number. Health Canada contacted the University of Pennsylvania Health System and found that it is not the author of the sodium laureth sulfate warning and does not endorse any link between SLS and cancer. Health Canada considers SLS safe for use in cosmetics. Therefore, you can continue to use cosmetics containing SLS without worry.” Further, according to the American Cancer Society’s Web site (www.cancer.org), “Contrary to popular rumors on the Internet, Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS) and Sodium Laureth Sulfate (SLES) do not cause cancer. E-mails have been flying through cyberspace claiming SLS [and SLES] causes cancer … and is proven to cause cancer.... [Yet] A search of recognized medical journals yielded no published articles relating this substance to cancer in humans.” See surfactant and Paula's article, Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and Sodium Laureth Sulfate. Sodium Lauryl Sulfate & Sodium Laureth Sulfate
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#Post 4 of 4 OFFLINE   Aquilah

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Posted 14 November 2006 - 01:10 AM

Originally Posted by jessimau /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Sodium Lauryl or Laureth Sulfate are the harsher ones.

Originally Posted by jessimau /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Here's what Paula Begoun (cosmetics cop) has to say:
ammonium laureth sulfate. Can be derived from coconut; used primarily as a detergent cleansing agent and is considered to be gentle and effective. See surfactant.

ammonium lauryl sulfate. Can be derived from coconut; used primarily as a detergent cleansing agent and is considered to be gentle and effective. See surfactant.

sodium lauryl sulfate. There has been a great deal of misinformation about sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) being circulated on the Internet. Used primarily as a detergent cleansing agent SLS can be derived from coconut. Although it is a potent skin irritant it is not toxic or dangerous for skin. In concentrations of 2% to 5%, SLS can cause allergic or sensitizing reactions in lots of people. It is used as a standard in scientific studies to establish irritatancy or sensitizing properties of other ingredients (Sources: European Journal of Dermatology, September-October 2001, pages 416–419; American Journal of Contact Dermatitis, March 2001, pages 28–32; and Skin Pharmacology and Applied Skin Physiology, September-October 2000, pages 246–257). Being a skin irritant, however, is not the same as a link to cancer, which is what erroneous warnings on the Internet are falsely claiming about this ingredient!

According to Health Canada, in a press release of February 12, 1999 (www.hc-sc.gc.ca/), “A letter has been circulating the Internet which claims that there is a link between cancer and sodium laureth (or lauryl) sulfate (SLS), an ingredient used in [cosmetics]. Health Canada has looked into the matter and has found no scientific evidence to suggest that SLS causes cancer. It has a history of safe use in Canada. Upon further investigation, it was discovered that this e-mail warning is a hoax. The letter is signed by a person at the University of Pennsylvania Health System and includes a phone number. Health Canada contacted the University of Pennsylvania Health System and found that it is not the author of the sodium laureth sulfate warning and does not endorse any link between SLS and cancer. Health Canada considers SLS safe for use in cosmetics. Therefore, you can continue to use cosmetics containing SLS without worry.” Further, according to the American Cancer Society’s Web site (www.cancer.org), “Contrary to popular rumors on the Internet, Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS) and Sodium Laureth Sulfate (SLES) do not cause cancer. E-mails have been flying through cyberspace claiming SLS [and SLES] causes cancer … and is proven to cause cancer.... [Yet] A search of recognized medical journals yielded no published articles relating this substance to cancer in humans.” See surfactant and Paula's article, Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and Sodium Laureth Sulfate. Sodium Lauryl Sulfate & Sodium Laureth Sulfate
Thanks for the info!
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