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Shedding new light on Dr. Perricone and his Wrinkle Cure

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Ladies, I found this article in a previous edition of the Nutrition Action Health Letter. I really appreciate articles that are not out to sell anything!

Wrinkle-free for life?

Nicholas Perricone claims that his diet, supplement, and cosmetics regimen prevents--and even reverses--wrinkles, sagging skin, and other signs of aging.

The Connecticut dermatologist seems to be popping up everywhere. His "The Wrinkle Cure" and "The Perricone Prescription" have spent time on the best-seller lists. His expensive line of supplements and even-pricier cosmetics have done well (sales for the cosmetics are expected to top $80 million this year). And his infomercial was one of the top fund-raising attractions for public television stations last year.

One place you won't see him any more is at Yale University. Although the jacket of "The Wrinkle Cure" identifies Perricone as "Yale University's dermatological and anti-aging expert," it turns out that he wasn't exactly teaching or researching up a storm there.

"Dr. Perricone held an unpaid appointment as assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Yale School of Medicine," said a university statement. "In that capacity, he provided oversight to medical students in a clinical setting several times per year. His appointment expired in June 2002."

Perricone quickly landed another academic title, at his alma mater, Michigan State University. Two months after appointing him an adjunct professor, MSU announced that Perricone had given the school $5 million. (The university denies that there was any connection between the appointment and the gift.)

What's so appealing about Perricone's message?

"The smooth skin that contributes so much to your youthful appearance does not have to be lost during mid-life and beyond...." he says in "The Perricone Prescription." "You can reverse and certainly prevent visible skin damage .... Being wrinkle free for life is achievable

But not everyone buys into Perricone's pitch.

"He proclaims these ideas, but he hasn't studied them at all, at least anything that's been published," says Sheldon Pinnell, former chair of the division of dermatology at the Duke University Medical Center. "You can say without any argument at all that Perricone has never done a credible experiment that proves his program does what he says it does."

"There's a retreat from hard data," says Barbara Gilchrest, chair of the department of dermatology at Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center. "There's lots of testimonials and hand-waving. Nick Perricone has made a fortune talking about this. I'm happy for him, but I'm not sure how much of a service it is to the consuming public."

So why was Perricone's untested program used to raise money by so many public broacasting stations during the past year? "He had good credentials, we didn't hear any criticism of his books, and our producers who watched the program thought it was good," says PBS vice president of programming Gustavo Sagastume. PBS never asked outside experts to review Perricone's claims.

Among those claims (Perricone never responded to our request for an interview):

* PROTEIN. "The contemporary American diet rarely contains protein in sufficient quantity to maintain and repair cell and skin health," says Perricone. That's why he recommends 10 to 14 ounces per day of high-quality animal protein like fish, egg whites, or skinless chicken and turkey breast.

The truth: Most Americans already eat about twice as much protein as they need, much of it high-quality animal protein. And no one has tested a high-protein diet on skin wrinkling.

* GLYCEMIC HORRORS. "Think twice before you reach for a carrot," says Perricone. Why? "When foods rapidly convert to sugar in the bloodstream ... they cause browning, or glycating of the protein in your tissues. ... Glycation can occur in skin as well, creating detrimental age-related changes to collagen--and that means deep wrinkles." Among Perricone's "Foods to Avoid": bananas, bread, cereals (except non-instant oatmeal), dried fruit, fruit juice, mango, oranges, papaya, popcorn, rice, and watermelon. Vegetables to shun include beets, corn, cooked carrots, and sweet potatoes.
The truth: "There are several missing links of scientific data that would be required to substantiate this claim," says blood sugar (glucose) expert Cyril Kendall of the University of Toronto. "As far as I am aware, no studies have looked at glucose in the diet and skin wrinkling. The claim just isn't supported by the scientific literature."

* SALMON. "Of all the foods that can keep you young," says Perricone, "fish tops the list." He singles out salmon, because of its protein, anti-inflammatory fatty acids, and (he claims) DMAE (dimethylaminoethanol). He calls the fish "your magic bullet for great skin tone, keeping your face firm and contoured."

The truth: While salmon and other fish may reduce your risk of heart disease, there is no evidence that they prevent wrinkles. What's more, there is no credible evidence that DMAE in food or supplements can smooth the skin. And none of the scientists we contacted (at the National Marine Fisheries Service, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the School of Aquatic and Fishery Science at the University of Washington) could even confirm that DMAE is found in salmon.

* ALPHA LIPOIC ACID. It's "one of the most powerful antiaging, antioxidant, anti-inflammatories available," says Perricone. "It blocks the production of enzymes that damage the collagen fibers, preserving a smooth skin surface. It is equally effective in preventing glycation, the harmful effects of sugar molecules on collagen fibers."

The truth: "Lipoic acid is an antioxidant and does have antioxidant powers," says Pinnell. "But there's no evidence that having extra lipoic acid in the skin is effective. It's not a bad idea. It just doesn't seem to work."

Then there's Perricone's daily vitamin regimen--a multivitamin and at least a dozen other supplements with breakfast and half a dozen more with lunch. You can conveniently order them from Perricone's Web site. Total cost for the "antioxidants, B-complex energy enhancers, macrominerals, lipotropic factors, enzymes, and herbal extracts" in Perricone's Skin & Total Body Nutritional Supplements: $120 a month. (You can also order a month's worth of Perricone's Weight Management Program supplements for $195, but that's another story.)

And don't forget the liquid cleansers, moisturizers, and morning and bedtime wrinkle-free skin care products you'll need. Perricone offers four "recommended" collections of "cosmeceuticals." Recommendation #3, for example, consists of "8 products designed to reduce the appearance of loss of tone, sagging skin, and fine lines." At $438, it's the least costly of the four.

Being wrinkle-free for life isn't cheap.

Wrinkle-Free For Life?
COPYRIGHT 2003 Center for Science in the Public Interest
COPYRIGHT 2003 Gale Group
post #2 of 12
Originally Posted by KittySkyfish
Ladies, I found this article in a previous edition of the Nutrition Action Health Letter. I really appreciate articles that are not out to sell anything!

Wrinkle-free for life?

Nicholas Perricone claims that his diet, supplement, and cosmetics regimen prevents--and even reverses--wrinkles, sagging skin, and other signs of aging.

The Connecticut dermatologist seems to be popping up everywhere. His "The Wrinkle Cure" and "The Perricone Prescription" have spent time on the best-seller lists. His expensive line of supplements and even-pricier cosmetics have done well (sales for the cosmetics are expected to top $80 million this year). And his infomercial was one of the top fund-raising attractions for public television stations last year.

One place you won't see him any more is at Yale University. Although the jacket of "The Wrinkle Cure" identifies Perricone as "Yale University's dermatological and anti-aging expert," it turns out that he wasn't exactly teaching or researching up a storm there.

"Dr. Perricone held an unpaid appointment as assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Yale School of Medicine," said a university statement. "In that capacity, he provided oversight to medical students in a clinical setting several times per year. His appointment expired in June 2002."

Perricone quickly landed another academic title, at his alma mater, Michigan State University. Two months after appointing him an adjunct professor, MSU announced that Perricone had given the school $5 million. (The university denies that there was any connection between the appointment and the gift.)

What's so appealing about Perricone's message?

"The smooth skin that contributes so much to your youthful appearance does not have to be lost during mid-life and beyond...." he says in "The Perricone Prescription." "You can reverse and certainly prevent visible skin damage .... Being wrinkle free for life is achievable

But not everyone buys into Perricone's pitch.

"He proclaims these ideas, but he hasn't studied them at all, at least anything that's been published," says Sheldon Pinnell, former chair of the division of dermatology at the Duke University Medical Center. "You can say without any argument at all that Perricone has never done a credible experiment that proves his program does what he says it does."

"There's a retreat from hard data," says Barbara Gilchrest, chair of the department of dermatology at Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center. "There's lots of testimonials and hand-waving. Nick Perricone has made a fortune talking about this. I'm happy for him, but I'm not sure how much of a service it is to the consuming public."

So why was Perricone's untested program used to raise money by so many public broacasting stations during the past year? "He had good credentials, we didn't hear any criticism of his books, and our producers who watched the program thought it was good," says PBS vice president of programming Gustavo Sagastume. PBS never asked outside experts to review Perricone's claims.

Among those claims (Perricone never responded to our request for an interview):

* PROTEIN. "The contemporary American diet rarely contains protein in sufficient quantity to maintain and repair cell and skin health," says Perricone. That's why he recommends 10 to 14 ounces per day of high-quality animal protein like fish, egg whites, or skinless chicken and turkey breast.

The truth: Most Americans already eat about twice as much protein as they need, much of it high-quality animal protein. And no one has tested a high-protein diet on skin wrinkling.

* GLYCEMIC HORRORS. "Think twice before you reach for a carrot," says Perricone. Why? "When foods rapidly convert to sugar in the bloodstream ... they cause browning, or glycating of the protein in your tissues. ... Glycation can occur in skin as well, creating detrimental age-related changes to collagen--and that means deep wrinkles." Among Perricone's "Foods to Avoid": bananas, bread, cereals (except non-instant oatmeal), dried fruit, fruit juice, mango, oranges, papaya, popcorn, rice, and watermelon. Vegetables to shun include beets, corn, cooked carrots, and sweet potatoes.
The truth: "There are several missing links of scientific data that would be required to substantiate this claim," says blood sugar (glucose) expert Cyril Kendall of the University of Toronto. "As far as I am aware, no studies have looked at glucose in the diet and skin wrinkling. The claim just isn't supported by the scientific literature."

* SALMON. "Of all the foods that can keep you young," says Perricone, "fish tops the list." He singles out salmon, because of its protein, anti-inflammatory fatty acids, and (he claims) DMAE (dimethylaminoethanol). He calls the fish "your magic bullet for great skin tone, keeping your face firm and contoured."

The truth: While salmon and other fish may reduce your risk of heart disease, there is no evidence that they prevent wrinkles. What's more, there is no credible evidence that DMAE in food or supplements can smooth the skin. And none of the scientists we contacted (at the National Marine Fisheries Service, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the School of Aquatic and Fishery Science at the University of Washington) could even confirm that DMAE is found in salmon.

* ALPHA LIPOIC ACID. It's "one of the most powerful antiaging, antioxidant, anti-inflammatories available," says Perricone. "It blocks the production of enzymes that damage the collagen fibers, preserving a smooth skin surface. It is equally effective in preventing glycation, the harmful effects of sugar molecules on collagen fibers."

The truth: "Lipoic acid is an antioxidant and does have antioxidant powers," says Pinnell. "But there's no evidence that having extra lipoic acid in the skin is effective. It's not a bad idea. It just doesn't seem to work."

Then there's Perricone's daily vitamin regimen--a multivitamin and at least a dozen other supplements with breakfast and half a dozen more with lunch. You can conveniently order them from Perricone's Web site. Total cost for the "antioxidants, B-complex energy enhancers, macrominerals, lipotropic factors, enzymes, and herbal extracts" in Perricone's Skin & Total Body Nutritional Supplements: $120 a month. (You can also order a month's worth of Perricone's Weight Management Program supplements for $195, but that's another story.)

And don't forget the liquid cleansers, moisturizers, and morning and bedtime wrinkle-free skin care products you'll need. Perricone offers four "recommended" collections of "cosmeceuticals." Recommendation #3, for example, consists of "8 products designed to reduce the appearance of loss of tone, sagging skin, and fine lines." At $438, it's the least costly of the four.

Being wrinkle-free for life isn't cheap.

Wrinkle-Free For Life?
COPYRIGHT 2003 Center for Science in the Public Interest
COPYRIGHT 2003 Gale Group
Interesting read KittySky. His reputation is like a pumped-up resume where the truth is there somehow, yet it is deceptive. I am always skeptical of anyone who says they have ALL the answers! Anyway, there are always buyers out there and that is why anyone can be a success if they pray on the right thing- especially on fears and insecurities.
Great read. Tx!
post #3 of 12
Originally Posted by KittySkyfish
Ladies, I found this article in a previous edition of the Nutrition Action Health Letter. I really appreciate articles that are not out to sell anything!

Wrinkle-free for life?

Nicholas Perricone claims that his diet, supplement, and cosmetics regimen prevents--and even reverses--wrinkles, sagging skin, and other signs of aging.

The Connecticut dermatologist seems to be popping up everywhere. His "The Wrinkle Cure" and "The Perricone Prescription" have spent time on the best-seller lists. His expensive line of supplements and even-pricier cosmetics have done well (sales for the cosmetics are expected to top $80 million this year). And his infomercial was one of the top fund-raising attractions for public television stations last year.

One place you won't see him any more is at Yale University. Although the jacket of "The Wrinkle Cure" identifies Perricone as "Yale University's dermatological and anti-aging expert," it turns out that he wasn't exactly teaching or researching up a storm there.

"Dr. Perricone held an unpaid appointment as assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Yale School of Medicine," said a university statement. "In that capacity, he provided oversight to medical students in a clinical setting several times per year. His appointment expired in June 2002."

Perricone quickly landed another academic title, at his alma mater, Michigan State University. Two months after appointing him an adjunct professor, MSU announced that Perricone had given the school $5 million. (The university denies that there was any connection between the appointment and the gift.)

What's so appealing about Perricone's message?

"The smooth skin that contributes so much to your youthful appearance does not have to be lost during mid-life and beyond...." he says in "The Perricone Prescription." "You can reverse and certainly prevent visible skin damage .... Being wrinkle free for life is achievable

But not everyone buys into Perricone's pitch.

"He proclaims these ideas, but he hasn't studied them at all, at least anything that's been published," says Sheldon Pinnell, former chair of the division of dermatology at the Duke University Medical Center. "You can say without any argument at all that Perricone has never done a credible experiment that proves his program does what he says it does."

"There's a retreat from hard data," says Barbara Gilchrest, chair of the department of dermatology at Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center. "There's lots of testimonials and hand-waving. Nick Perricone has made a fortune talking about this. I'm happy for him, but I'm not sure how much of a service it is to the consuming public."

So why was Perricone's untested program used to raise money by so many public broacasting stations during the past year? "He had good credentials, we didn't hear any criticism of his books, and our producers who watched the program thought it was good," says PBS vice president of programming Gustavo Sagastume. PBS never asked outside experts to review Perricone's claims.

Among those claims (Perricone never responded to our request for an interview):

* PROTEIN. "The contemporary American diet rarely contains protein in sufficient quantity to maintain and repair cell and skin health," says Perricone. That's why he recommends 10 to 14 ounces per day of high-quality animal protein like fish, egg whites, or skinless chicken and turkey breast.

The truth: Most Americans already eat about twice as much protein as they need, much of it high-quality animal protein. And no one has tested a high-protein diet on skin wrinkling.

* GLYCEMIC HORRORS. "Think twice before you reach for a carrot," says Perricone. Why? "When foods rapidly convert to sugar in the bloodstream ... they cause browning, or glycating of the protein in your tissues. ... Glycation can occur in skin as well, creating detrimental age-related changes to collagen--and that means deep wrinkles." Among Perricone's "Foods to Avoid": bananas, bread, cereals (except non-instant oatmeal), dried fruit, fruit juice, mango, oranges, papaya, popcorn, rice, and watermelon. Vegetables to shun include beets, corn, cooked carrots, and sweet potatoes.
The truth: "There are several missing links of scientific data that would be required to substantiate this claim," says blood sugar (glucose) expert Cyril Kendall of the University of Toronto. "As far as I am aware, no studies have looked at glucose in the diet and skin wrinkling. The claim just isn't supported by the scientific literature."

* SALMON. "Of all the foods that can keep you young," says Perricone, "fish tops the list." He singles out salmon, because of its protein, anti-inflammatory fatty acids, and (he claims) DMAE (dimethylaminoethanol). He calls the fish "your magic bullet for great skin tone, keeping your face firm and contoured."

The truth: While salmon and other fish may reduce your risk of heart disease, there is no evidence that they prevent wrinkles. What's more, there is no credible evidence that DMAE in food or supplements can smooth the skin. And none of the scientists we contacted (at the National Marine Fisheries Service, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the School of Aquatic and Fishery Science at the University of Washington) could even confirm that DMAE is found in salmon.

* ALPHA LIPOIC ACID. It's "one of the most powerful antiaging, antioxidant, anti-inflammatories available," says Perricone. "It blocks the production of enzymes that damage the collagen fibers, preserving a smooth skin surface. It is equally effective in preventing glycation, the harmful effects of sugar molecules on collagen fibers."

The truth: "Lipoic acid is an antioxidant and does have antioxidant powers," says Pinnell. "But there's no evidence that having extra lipoic acid in the skin is effective. It's not a bad idea. It just doesn't seem to work."

Then there's Perricone's daily vitamin regimen--a multivitamin and at least a dozen other supplements with breakfast and half a dozen more with lunch. You can conveniently order them from Perricone's Web site. Total cost for the "antioxidants, B-complex energy enhancers, macrominerals, lipotropic factors, enzymes, and herbal extracts" in Perricone's Skin & Total Body Nutritional Supplements: $120 a month. (You can also order a month's worth of Perricone's Weight Management Program supplements for $195, but that's another story.)

And don't forget the liquid cleansers, moisturizers, and morning and bedtime wrinkle-free skin care products you'll need. Perricone offers four "recommended" collections of "cosmeceuticals." Recommendation #3, for example, consists of "8 products designed to reduce the appearance of loss of tone, sagging skin, and fine lines." At $438, it's the least costly of the four.

Being wrinkle-free for life isn't cheap.

Wrinkle-Free For Life?
COPYRIGHT 2003 Center for Science in the Public Interest
COPYRIGHT 2003 Gale Group
Thanks for sharing Kitty..Interesting, indeed..I think Dr. Perricone is a quack in my opinion..If his techniques worked so well then why does he have such a heavily operated looking face? He packages his items to look like prescriptions in a doctor's bag but I found it to be garbage; in my opinion.
post #4 of 12
Fabulous article! Thanks for posting this! Finally, reporting that tells it like it is. There really IS NOTHING out there that is good for skin other than sunblock.
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
I agree with everyone's posts. Dr. Perricone is just another entrepreneur making lots of money off of women's fears about aging. I do believe that antioxidants are good in skincare, but I don't need to spend a fortune reaping the benefits!

Having said that, I'm still loving my La Mer Lifting Concentrate + Intensifier at $285 per set! LOL! It works well enough, but I'm going to get an antioxidant serum that's less expensive next time.
post #6 of 12
Very interesting post Kitty! Do you think if Dr Perricones treatments weren't so expensive then what he is saying might be more believable? It is obvious you enjoy using a premium skincare brand and take anti aging very seriously. Since La Mer is very expensive, do you think it is worth the money and do the products live up to your expectations? I'd be interested to know your thoughts on this.
I was thinking about buying his book The Perricone Prescription, as i was reading an article in one of the women's magazines.
Oh and just for the record, i was watching a programme called Beautification which is hosted by Rubbie and Millie (makeup artists) and apart from demonstarting makeup application they test out different products on a blind trial. On this occasion they were testing face firming treatments. Of the 3 products tested, Roc Protient Lift(£20) Dr Perricones face firming activator (£110) and another i cant remember which product it was. Anyway the clear favorite was the Roc Protient Lift (which was quite surprising considering it was the cheapest of the 3 products tested).
So in a nut shell, do you think Dr Pirricones products would work?
post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hi candy! I think - to an extent - Perricone's products would work. There is enough independent research out there that supports the benefits of topical antioxidants in an anti-aging routine. And his dietary suggestions also have some merit, if you look at his focus on Omega fatty acids and how good nuitrition plays a large role in skin health. But his methods are overzealous and his products are waaaaay overpriced, IMHO. So, I think your money would be better spend with other brands.

I gave the La Mer serum a shot because I was wanting an anti-aging serum that was separate from my moisturizers. Sometimes I do facials that will stimulate my skin so much that I don't want anything active applied afterwards, so I would just skip my serum that night and just focus on hydrating. Some of my friends love the La Mer line and that was another reason why I bought the serum. The La Mer serum is really effective and I've found it gives my skin a smoothness and brightness I didn't see before. But, it is EXPENSIVE. Once I use this up, I'm going to try the acerola serum from DHC and see if several months on a lesser expensive product is going to create a reversal in the effects of La Mer. I've been testing products from DHC and their quality is very nice and price-wise they're not insane. Which is good!

I'm finding my skincare routine needs to adapt to the current conditions of my skin. Last year about this time, I focused more on exfoliation through retinoids with a pairing of 1x per week deep manual exfoliation. For about 8 months this process went from improving my skintone, maintaining my skintone, then making my skin sensitive and blotchy. What I found out is that my routine brought me to an optimal point, but then I failed to cut back the treatments to a maintenance level. I developed hyperpigmentation on my upper lip as a result. Now, I have cut out the retinoids and do the manual exfoliation about once every two weeks. Now my skin is looking like it was in the optimal level and I've learned my lesson about being overzealous with anti-aging treatments. Maybe in another year my skin will welcome retinoids again!


Originally Posted by candy
Very interesting post Kitty! Do you think if Dr Perricones treatments weren't so expensive then what he is saying might be more believable? It is obvious you enjoy using a premium skincare brand and take anti aging very seriously. Since La Mer is very expensive, do you think it is worth the money and do the products live up to your expectations? I'd be interested to know your thoughts on this.
I was thinking about buying his book The Perricone Prescription, as i was reading an article in one of the women's magazines.
Oh and just for the record, i was watching a programme called Beautification which is hosted by Rubbie and Millie (makeup artists) and apart from demonstarting makeup application they test out different products on a blind trial. On this occasion they were testing face firming treatments. Of the 3 products tested, Roc Protient Lift(£20) Dr Perricones face firming activator (£110) and another i cant remember which product it was. Anyway the clear favorite was the Roc Protient Lift (which was quite surprising considering it was the cheapest of the 3 products tested).
So in a nut shell, do you think Dr Pirricones products would work?
post #8 of 12
Originally Posted by KittySkyfish
Hi candy! I think - to an extent - Perricone's products would work. There is enough independent research out there that supports the benefits of topical antioxidants in an anti-aging routine. And his dietary suggestions also have some merit, if you look at his focus on Omega fatty acids and how good nuitrition plays a large role in skin health. But his methods are overzealous and his products are waaaaay overpriced, IMHO. So, I think your money would be better spend with other brands.

I gave the La Mer serum a shot because I was wanting an anti-aging serum that was separate from my moisturizers. Sometimes I do facials that will stimulate my skin so much that I don't want anything active applied afterwards, so I would just skip my serum that night and just focus on hydrating. Some of my friends love the La Mer line and that was another reason why I bought the serum. The La Mer serum is really effective and I've found it gives my skin a smoothness and brightness I didn't see before. But, it is EXPENSIVE. Once I use this up, I'm going to try the acerola serum from DHC and see if several months on a lesser expensive product is going to create a reversal in the effects of La Mer. I've been testing products from DHC and their quality is very nice and price-wise they're not insane. Which is good!

I'm finding my skincare routine needs to adapt to the current conditions of my skin. Last year about this time, I focused more on exfoliation through retinoids with a pairing of 1x per week deep manual exfoliation. For about 8 months this process went from improving my skintone, maintaining my skintone, then making my skin sensitive and blotchy. What I found out is that my routine brought me to an optimal point, but then I failed to cut back the treatments to a maintenance level. I developed hyperpigmentation on my upper lip as a result. Now, I have cut out the retinoids and do the manual exfoliation about once every two weeks. Now my skin is looking like it was in the optimal level and I've learned my lesson about being overzealous with anti-aging treatments. Maybe in another year my skin will welcome retinoids again!
Hey, this made me think... the upper lip hyperpigmentation can also be caused by hormones from different birth control methods. I wonder if this was a factor?
Things that make you go Even if you are currently not on b/c (didnt' you say you were trying for a baby? ) hormones can stay around for a long time.
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
Well, I haven't been on any form of birth control since the Spring of 2000 and the pigmentation became noticable last year...but I see what you mean! John just had a vasectomy reversal done in July, so prior to this there was no need for protection. Not that we need it now, either. I'm learning to rest with my legs in the air, if you know what I mean...


Originally Posted by Californian
Hey, this made me think... the upper lip hyperpigmentation can also be caused by hormones from different birth control methods. I wonder if this was a factor?
Things that make you go Even if you are currently not on b/c (didnt' you say you were trying for a baby? ) hormones can stay around for a long time.
post #10 of 12
Hi Kitty, and Thanks for gettingback to me. It sounds like you know what you are talking about with regards all the different products out there and what you are using on your skin. I also take my skincare quite seriously and was thinking that perhaps i should be using products that work on a cellular level, rather than just a simple skincare range. What do you think?xxx
post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hi candy, it took me a while to get back to this post. Sorry!

I'm not sure what you're using right now, but there are a lot of products on the market, in all price ranges, that do work on a cellular level because they include supplimental antioxidants, minerals, organic ingredients that are antioxidants in nature and AHAs. Sheesh! It's so hard to keep up with all that is touted as effective and what really is good. But honestly I don't know everything about what is going on out there...I love skin care but I'm not married to my face! LOL!

From my experiences, AHAs such as retinol, glycolic acid and lactic acid have done a great job of brightening the skin and giving it a smoother finish. They also do work well for softening fine lines and increasing hydration, when the AHA is a low percentage. I also have seen good age retardation with creams that are rich in antioxidants and minerals such as copper.

My .02 cents would be that AHAs provide more immediate results and do a better job of softening lines and fading spots. Antioxidants are more protective and better at keeping the skin looking good for as long as possible. Minerals I'm honestly not so sure about. The benefits I read about them seem to be duplicated in either AHAs or antioxidant vitamins such as E and C. Then again, I haven't used serums or creams specifically touting copper or magnesium as their key anti-aging ingredient so I have little to refer to.

A bit about my skin care routine: As I've been learning more about skin care, I think I'm making better judgement calls to what I need right now in my life. I'm 33, non-acne prone, fair skin that's in very good condition and I live in a tropical climate. What I'm trying to do is do preventative care as a first priority. This includes sunblock everyday and supplimenting my skin with antioxidants to further combat free-radical development that occurs with incidental sun exposure. I learned to cut back on my exfoliation because my skin doesn't need any more refining PLUS living in a tropical climate means very harsh sun. I'm not completely convinced that long-term usage of AHAs in this type of environment, even when using sunblocks, is what I should be doing. Now, the UK would be entirely different!

I'm falling further in love with DHC skin care. It's offers a wide range of products to suit all needs and everything I've tried or sampled has been very good. http://www.dhccare.com/en/default.aspx I'm also interested in trying the Korres line that allisong has an open thread on. http://www.korres.com/

HTH some!


Originally Posted by candy
Hi Kitty, and Thanks for gettingback to me. It sounds like you know what you are talking about with regards all the different products out there and what you are using on your skin. I also take my skincare quite seriously and was thinking that perhaps i should be using products that work on a cellular level, rather than just a simple skincare range. What do you think?xxx
post #12 of 12

Hi there! This was an interesting article, however I have found Dr. Perricone's books to be a great read. It encourages readers to eat healthy, and cut out processed foods. If he needs to get people to read by stating that it improves wrinkles, so be it. There are plenty of research that does show how what we eat improves our skin. 

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