Jump to content

spiderwoman

Members
  • Content Count

    4
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About spiderwoman

  • Rank
    Trainee
  1. Dandruff is a common chronic scalp condition marked by flaking of the skin on your scalp. Dandruff isn't contagious or serious. But it can be embarrassing and sometimes difficult to treat. The good news is that dandruff usually can be controlled. Mild cases of dandruff may need nothing more than daily shampooing with a gentle cleanser. More-stubborn cases of dandruff often respond to medicated shampoos. Symptoms For most teens and adults, dandruff symptoms are easy to spot: white, oily-looking flakes of dead skin that dot your hair and shoulders, and a possibly itchy, scaly scalp. The condition may worsen during the fall and winter, when indoor heating can contribute to dry skin, and improve during the summer. A type of dandruff called cradle cap can affect babies. This disorder, which causes a scaly, crusty scalp, is most common in newborns, but it can occur anytime during infancy. Although it can be alarming for parents, cradle cap isn't dangerous and usually clears up on its own. Dandruff can have several causes, including: Irritated, oily skin (seborrheic dermatitis). This condition, one of the most frequent causes of dandruff, is marked by red, greasy skin covered with flaky white or yellow scales. Seborrheic dermatitis may affect your scalp and other areas rich in oil glands, such as your eyebrows, the sides of your nose and the backs of your ears, your breastbone (sternum), your groin area, and sometimes your armpits. Not shampooing often enough. If you don't regularly wash your hair, oils and skin cells from your scalp can build up, causing dandruff. A yeastlike fungus (malassezia). Malassezia lives on the scalps of most adults. But, for some, it irritates the scalp and can cause more skin cells to grow. The extra skin cells die and fall off, making them appear white and flaky in your hair or on your clothes. Why malassezia irritates some scalps isn't known. Dry skin. Flakes from dry skin are generally smaller and less oily than those from other causes of dandruff. And, redness or inflammation is unlikely. You'll probably have dry skin on other parts of the body, such as your legs and arms, too. Sensitivity to hair care products (contact dermatitis). Sometimes sensitivities to certain ingredients in hair care products or hair dyes can cause a red, itchy, scaly scalp. Source: https://hapiwoman.blogspot.com/2019/04/dandruff-symptoms-causes-woman-hair.html
  2. Think about Your Water What's more, tailor your healthy skin items as needs be. "Delicate water doesn't evacuate cleanser well, so it can leave a buildup on your skin," says Susan H. Weinkle, a colleague clinical teacher of dermatology at the University of South Florida, in Tampa. In the event that your water is delicate, use face and body chemicals sparingly (close to a nickel-or quarter-measure sum, individually). Hard water, then again, doesn't enable washes to foam effectively, provoking you to utilize much more chemical, which can cause dryness. Delicate, nonsoap recipes, which aren't intended to foam, can limit this, says Carolyn Jacob, a dermatologist in Chicago. Specialists recommend attempting Avène Extremely Gentle Cleanser ($24; dermstore.com). To check the water quality in your general vicinity, sign on to the Environmental Protection Agency's site (epa.gov).Drink Green Tea "On the off chance that your appearance is red or smeared, this current tea's calming properties can be relieving," says Andrea Cambio, a dermatologist in Cape Coral, Florida. "Frosted is best on the grounds that hot drinks can compound redness and different indications of rosacea." Another advantage: The epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) in green tea may help counteract the collagen decimation that prompts wrinkles just as sun-actuated DNA harm in the skin (think lines and staining), as indicated by certain specialists. Consider subbing tea for your morning cup of espresso.Hold Stress in Check It negatively affects about all aspects of your body, including your skin. In an examination directed at Stanford University, scientists found that amid test time, understudies who felt focused had more serious skin break out breakouts than did those under less weight. That is on the grounds that pressure builds the body's creation of hormones, for example, cortisol, which can make skin oilier and decline its capacity to fend off skin break out causing microorganisms, says Lisa Donofrio, a partner clinical teacher of dermatology at the Yale University School of Medicine. To monitor that fatigued inclination, routinely practice pressure the board methods, similar to yoga, profound breathing, and reflection. This "can help conditions, for example, skin break out, psoriasis, rosacea, and seborrhea," Donofrio says. source: https://hapiwoman.blogspot.com/2019/04/real-simple-steps-to-better-skin.html
  3. Nice to meet this web. it's very interesting
  4. Hair goes through three cycles: The anagen phase (growing phase) can last from two years to eight years. This phase generally refers to about 85% to 90% of the hair on your head.The catagen phase (transition phase) is the time that hair follicles shrink and takes about two to three weeks.The telogen phase (resting phase) takes about two to four months. At the end of this phase, the hair falls out. Source: https://hapiwoman.blogspot.com/2019/05/what-women-can-do-about-hair-loss.html
  • NARS Cosmetics Shop Cargo Cosmetics Today!

About MakeupTalk®

© 2003-2018 MakeupTalk.com®, an active online community and message board geared towards members wanting to discuss everything to do with makeup, cosmetics, product reviews, monthly subscription boxes and general beauty related topics. Our community provides product reviews, makeup and general beauty tips. Our most popular topics are subscription boxes and their monthly spoilers. Join our community for free to take part in the conversations and share your own beauty tips and product reviews with others. We look forward to seeing you online here at Makeuptalk®!

MakeupTalk® Facebook

×