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Darla

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Everything posted by Darla

  1. It looks a bit stupid. I sincerely hope no animal gave his life for that thing
  2. This is another one. Don't click on this link. This is bogus.
  3. THis is another one. Don't click on this link. This is bogus.
  4. Can't you just post pictures? Having to load software to view is really sketchy especially for someone not known on this web site.
  5. I totally agree with you. I think we are on the same page. So as far as some changes that would make sense here's some starters: Enact a permanent ban on assault weapons (such as AK-47) that expired in 2004. These guns have no sporting use Ban all high capacity magazine clips (including used ones) Require all military and DoD personnel to register their private weapons as the general public does (this is related to the Ft Hood shootings last year)
  6. Pumpkincat i appreciate the comments but I think it is worth pointing out that our First Amendment rights are not absolute anyway. The Supreme Court has determined that you cannot speak irresponsibly. For instance you cannot yell "FIRE" in a crowded theater nor can you say something that is completely false and injurious to a person because that would be considered libel. Why do some people think that the Second Amendment (Right to Bear Arms) is so absolute then with no restrictions permitted (like the NRA does)? Why are sensible restrictions on Second Amendment rights such a bad idea? Did the founding fathers actually think assault rifles were a good idea for instance? Seriously I support responsible gun ownership, I know people who hunt and appreciate other people are gun enthusiasts or collectors. Not a problem. But if you were a hunter what good would an AK-47 do? First the guns are not all that accurate and they are intended to inflict maximum damage on a battlefield. What use do they have either for hunting or self protection? These types of weapons need to be universally illegal. The idea that guns need to be preserved for the public to combat tyranny is the same mindset that let to Timothy McVeigh bombing the Murrow Federal Office Building in OKC. As for citizens having guns for law enforcement that is illegal too, for taking the law into your own hands is considered being a vigilante. Are we seriously expecting an invasion from the Russians like the movie, Red Dawn? Unrestricted gun ownership is crazy. Look at incidents like this (Tucson, Columbine etc) and you see incidents like this are hard to find in countries where gun ownership is sharply controlled, like Canada and the UK. The public attitude is changing get over it.
  7. Boy there has been so much random stuff posted recently about skin care. A lot very bogus. Here is a great authoritative article written by Paula Begoun. What Skin Needs The best products any skin-care company can offer to fight wrinkles and aging include the following ingredients: Sunscreen is the superstar of all superstars in the anti-aging category; of course, it must be a broad-spectrum sunscreen product rated SPF 15 or greater. I know that sunscreen isn´t nearly as sexy or exciting as the latest antiwrinkle cream dressed up in slick packaging, but when applied correctly (meaning liberally, daily, and before your skin encounters any daylight, 365 days a year) it is your best defense against wrinkles, discolorations, loss of firmness, and dullness. Exfoliants can remove built-up layers of dead, rough, thickened, uneven surface skin cells that make skin look wrinkled and dry; for example, sun-damaged skin causes the outer layer of skin to become thick. Some exfoliants also have research showing they can increase collagen production and improve the structure of skin´s outer layer. Antioxidants reduce inflammation, repair DNA damage, restore the skin´s surface barrier, help defend against environmental stress, allow skin to build more collagen, and improve skin´s ability to heal. All antioxidants also effectively help fight sun damage. You still need sunscreen, but skin needs all the help it can get! Cell-communicating ingredients, at least in theory, can "tell" skin cells to behave in a normal (meaning younger and undamaged) manner, leading to healthier and more normal functioning skin cells. Skin-identical substances, substances that are the same as the natural components in skin that hold skin cells together and protect it, can replenish and restore the skin‘s external barrier, making it soft and supple, diminishing and potentially eliminating dryness with repeated use, building collagen, and helping skin defend itself from environmental factors. Novel ingredients, at least some of them, can protect a skin cell´s membrane to keep it from being damaged by internal and external factors. Abundant research makes it crystal clear that all of these ingredients are as good as it gets in the world of skin care to fight wrinkling and skin aging. These state-of-the-art ingredients, especially when combined in a cocktail approach, mixing an assortment of these elements into one product, are without question, the types of ingredients you need, regardless of the name on the label or the product category: lotion, cream, gel, serum, moisturizer, anti-aging, or antiwrinkle. If the product doesn´t contain these ingredients, then why bother? The sticker price won´t help you. There are lots of expensive products that cheat your skin and lots of inexpensive products that generously serve up what your skin needs, and vice versa. You don´t need an eye cream and don´t buy jar packaging. There is no research showing that eye-area skin needs something different from skin on the rest of your face. And do not buy any "anti-aging" product in jar packaging because if it does contain state-of-the-art ingredients they won´t remain stable once you´ve opened the jar and exposed the contents to air. There Isn´t a "Best" Ingredient… …there are just lots of great ones. All of the ingredients listed above—antioxidants, skin-identical ingredients, and cell-communicating ingredients—are the leading elements that contribute to making a state-of-the-art moisturizer. And there are many brilliant formulations in stable packaging that include these substances. But, contrary to what cosmetics companies want you to believe about their products, there is no single miracle ingredient for skin. Month after month, new ingredients appear one after the other in the world of skin care, all claiming superiority over their predecessors. Even when there is research showing that the ingredient can be effective for skin, that doesn´t make it better or more essential than hundreds of other ingredients—it´s just another option, not a must have. Think about it like your diet. Although broccoli or grapes may be incredibly healthy to eat, if you eat only those foods your health will suffer. Skin is a complex structural organ that requires many substances to function in a younger and healthier manner. And by that, I mean to function the way it did before it became damaged by the sun. AHAs and BHA: Take Skin Beyond Smooth What they do: For all skin types, it is extremely helpful to exfoliate the surface layers of skin. Sun-damaged skin causes the outer layer of skin to become abnormally thick. For those with blemish-prone skin, the outer layer of skin is genetically thicker. Whether you use a product with glycolic or lactic acids, these alpha hydroxy acids (AHA) or salicylic acid (BHA, which is exceptional for normal to oily/combination skin) remove the outer layer of built-up dead skin cells, allowing healthier cells to come to the surface and smoothing the surface, thus eliminating some wrinkling. There also is a good deal of research showing that using a well-formulated AHA product can increase collagen production. AHAs in skin-care products are effective in concentrations ranging from 5% to 15%; salicylic acid is effective in 1% to 2% concentrations. Sources: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, April 2005, pages 1156-1162; Skin Pharmacology and Applied Skin Physiology, May-June 1999, pages 111-119; Archives of Dermatologic Research, June 1997, pages 404-409; and Dermatologic Surgery, May 1998, pages 573-577; Dermatologic Surgery, January 2008, pages 45-50; Archives of Internal Medicine, July 2002, pages 1531-1532; Annals of Dermatology and Venereology, January 2002, pages 137-142; Archives of Dermatology, November 2000, pages 1390-1395; Dermatology, 1999, volume 199, number 1, pages 50-53; and Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, volume 175, issue 1, pages 76-82.) Please see the list below for product recommendations with AHAs or BHA. Retinol: Vitamin A for Anti-Aging What it does: Retinol is the term used for the entire vitamin A molecule. Applied to skin, retinol is a beneficial cell-communicating ingredient and an antioxidant. Simply put, it helps skin cells create better, healthier skin cells and increases the amount of skin-support substances. Retinol has been shown to increase the skin´s collagen production and glycosaminoglycan content, resulting in firmer skin with an improved texture and enhanced barrier function. Although it is not the only ingredient to look for in an anti-aging product, it deserves strong consideration by anyone who wants to keep their skin in top shape through the years. In skin-care products, it is found in the form of retinol, retinyl palmitate, and retinylaldehyde. In prescription-only skin-care products, it is in the form of retinoic acid (also called tretinoin). Sources: Archives of Dermatology, May 2007, pages 606-612; Cosmetic Dermatology, supplement, Revisiting Retinol, January 2005, pages 1-20; Dermatologic Surgery, July 2005, pages 799-804; Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, April 2005, pages 1156-1162; Mechanisms of Ageing Development, July 2004, pages 465-473; and Journal of Dermatology, November 2001, pages 595-598. Please see the list below for product recommendations with retinol. Vitamin C: "C" the Difference it Makes What it does: One of the most well-researched and beneficial vitamins you can apply topically is vitamin C. It has been shown to increase collagen production (including dermal collagen, which is significant for wrinkle reduction), reduce the appearance of skin discolorations, strengthen skin´s barrier response, enhance skin´s repair process, reduce inflammation, and help skin better withstand exposure to sunlight, whether protected by sunscreen or not. Vitamin C comes in many forms, with ascorbic acid being the most common. Other forms of vitamin C include magnesium ascorbyl phosphate, L-ascorbic acid, tetrahexyldecyl ascorbate, ascorbyl palmitate, ascorbyl glucosamine, and ascorbyl tetraisopalmitate. Sources: International Journal of Toxicology, volume 24, supplement 2, 2005, pages 51-111; Experimental Dermatology, September 2005, pages 684-691, and June 2003, pages 237-244; Dermatologic Surgery, July 2005, pages 814-817; Nutrition Reviews, March 2005, pages 81-90; Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, November-December 2004, pages 298-303; BMC Dermatology, September 2004, page 13; International Journal of Dermatology, August 2004, pages 604-607; and Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, volume 5, issue 2m, March-April 2003, pages m145-m149. Please see the list below for product recommendations with stabilized vitamin C. Vitamin E: In a League of its Own What it does: Vitamin E (technical name tocopherol) is considered an antioxidant superstar in its own right. This fat-soluble vitamin is available in various forms with eight biologically active components, such as alpha tocopherol and beta tocopherol, or combined in an ingredient called tocotrienols. Simply put, vitamin E in all of its forms works in several different ways to protect cell membranes from oxidative damage and to prevent collagen from being destroyed. It also works in powerful synergy with vitamin C. Vitamin E on an ingredient label can be tocopheryl acetate, tocopheryl linoleate, tocotrienols, alpha tocopherol, and tocopheryl succinate. Sources: Dermatologic Therapy, September-October 2007, pages 314-321; International Journal of Immunopathology and Pharmacology, July-September 2005, pages 497-502; Experimental Dermatology, September 2005, pages 684-691; International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, July 2005, pages 116-119; Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, January-February 2005, pages 20-26; Journal of Investigative Dermatology, February 2005, pages 304-307; Photochemistry and Photobiology, April 1993, pages 613-615; and Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, January 2005, page 4. Please see the list below for product recommendations with various forms of vitamin E. Niacinamide: Vitamin B at its Best What it does: Niacinamide, also known as nicotinamide, is the active component of vitamin B3. When applied topically, niacinamide has been shown to increase ceramide and free fatty acid levels in skin, prevent skin from losing water content, and stimulate microcirculation in the dermis. It also has a growing reputation for being able to address skin discolorations (often in tandem with other proven skin-lightening agents such as vitamin C and glucosamine) and to reduce acne. It definitely belongs on the A-list of great skin-care ingredients regardless of your skin-care concern. Sources: British Journal of Dermatology, October 2003, page 681, and September 2000, pages 524-531; Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, April 2004, page 88; Dermatologic Surgery, July 2005, pages 860-865; Experimental Dermatology, July 2005, pages 498-508; Journal of Radiation Research, December 2004, pages 491-495; and Journal of Dermatological Science, volume 31, 2003, pages 193-201. Please see the list below for product recommendations with niacinamide. Green and White Tea What they do: Whether you drink green or white tea, both contain excellent antioxidants from the plant Camellia sinensis and both deserve your attention. There are four major antioxidant components of green and white tea, of which Epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG) is the most abundant and biologically active. Green tea is found more commonly in cosmetics than white tea, but both work quite well to reduce inflammation, build collagen, and reduce cell damage by impeding the harmful effects of sun exposure. EGCG also is found in cosmetics and is probably a more potent stable way to get the antioxidant benefit on skin. Sources: Histology and Histopathology, April 2008, pages 487-496; Journal of Medicinal Food, June 2007, pages 337-344; Photodermatology, Photoimmunology, and Photomedicine, February 2007, pages 48-56; Phytochemistry, September 2006, pages 1849-1855; and Journal of Dermatological Science, December 2005, pages 195-204. Please see the list below for product recommendations with green and white tea. Resveratrol What it does: Like any antioxidant, resveratrol has incredible protective benefit for skin. In nature it is found in foods such as grapes, nuts, fruits, and red wine. When applied topically, resveratrol protects against sun damage, improves collagen synthesis, and reduces cell damage. It is a stable, potent antioxidant worth finding in a skin-care product. In addition, studies have shown that resveratrol inhibits tumor development. Sources: Anticancer Research, September-October 2004, pages 2783–2840; Medicinal Chemistry, November 2005, pages 629–633; Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, May 2005, pages 405–430; Antioxidant Redox Signal, December 2001, pages 1041–1064; and Mutation Research, Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis, September 2001, pages 171–180). Please see the list below for product recommendations with resveratrol. Grape Seed What it does: Grape seed has been shown to be a potent antioxidant that significantly reduces free-radical damage. Combining it with other antioxidants greatly enhances its efficacy. It also has wound-healing properties. Regardless of the type of grape, it has antioxidant potential. For fighting wrinkles, it is one of the superstars. Sources: Phytotherapy Research, September 23, pages 1197-1204; Carcinogenesis, June 2009, pages 1008-1015; Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, June 2001, pages 187–200; and Toxicology, August 2000, pages 187–197; and Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry, April 2000, pages 1076–1080). Please see the list below for product recommendations with grape seed. Curcuminoids What they do: Curcuminoids are various compounds derived from the spice turmeric. Turmeric is the major ingredient in curry powder, a spice used to flavor many types of food. The curcuminoids are the major active constituents of turmeric. Curcumin is but one of these components, and is chemically known as diferuloylmethane). Curcumin has potent anti-inflammatory properties, both internally and externally (applied to skin). It also has activity against tumor formation. It is capable of causing cancerous cells to die while preserving healthy cells. The curcuminoids also have potent antioxidant ability and work to suppress excess melanin production in the presence of sunlight. Curcuminoids are considered safe for use on skin. They gain anti-aging superstar status due to their multiple benefits in addressing the underlying factors (chronic inflammation, irritation, sun damage) that cause skin to look older and become less able to repair itself. Sources: Toxicology Mechanisms and Methods, September 2009, pages 447–460; Cell Biology and Toxicology, March 2009, Epublication; Archives of Physiology and Biochemistry, April 2008, pages 127–149; Food Chemistry and Toxicology, August 2002, pages 1091–1097; Planta Medica, December 2001, pages 876–877;Japanese Journal of Cancer Research, April 1998, pages 361–370; and www.naturaldatabase.com Please see the list below for product recommendations with curcuminoids. Soy Isoflavones/Extract (Genistein) What they do: Soy and its components have an amazing amount of research showing them to be powerful antioxidants and beneficial for skin. Studies show that these derivatives inhibit environmental damage, reduce irritation, improve skin texture, build collagen, and fight sun damage. Genistein (a component of soy) benefits skin´s elasticity, strengthens the skin´s dermis, and prevents DNA damage. There is also research showing it improves the appearance of scars. Sources: Journal of Medicinal Food, April 2009, pages 429-434; Burns, February 2009, pages 89-97; Carcinogenesis, August 2006, pages 1627-1635; Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, June 2005, pages 1049-1059; Skin Pharmacology and Applied Skin Physiology, May-June 2002, pages 175-183; Cosmetics & Toiletries, June 2002, pages 45-50; Photodermatology, Photoimmunology, & Photomedicine, April 2003, page 56; and Journal of Cosmetic Science, September-October 2004, pages 473-479). Please see the list below for product recommendations with various forms of soy. Pomegranate What it does: Pomegranate and its extracts have antioxidant and anticancer properties that, while not conclusively demonstrated on human skin, show promise in animal and in vitro studies. Topical application of products containing pomegranate may improve the appearance of wrinkled skin by reducing inflammation and forestalling further damage. Research also shows that an extract from pomegranate peel has an inhibitory effect on the collagen-depleting substance MMP-1. Sources: Journal of Drugs in Dermatology, June 2009, pages S5-S9; International Journal of Cancer, January 2005, pages 423-433; Journal of Medicinal Food, Fall 2003, 157-161; Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry, January 2002, pages 81-86, and pages 166-171; International Journal of Oncology, May 2002, pages 983-986; and www.naturaldatabase.com. Please see the list below for product recommendations with pomegranate. Ceramides What they do: Ceramides make up about 20% of the skin´s intercellular matrix, the "glue" that holds skin cells together, helping skin maintain its appearance and protecting it. When the skin´s "matrix," also known as the skin´s outer barrier, is impaired, whether from sun damage, a dry environment, or irritating skin-care product, ceramides decrease and leave the skin vulnerable. Replenishing the skin´s ceramide content is a powerful way to protect skin and help it act and look younger. Sources: Journal of Lipid Research, September 2007; International Journal of Pharmaceutics, January 2006, pages 232-238; Journal of Investigative Dermatology, November 2001, pages 1126-1136; and Experimental Dermatology, October 2005, pages 719-726. Please see the list below for product recommendations with various ceramides. Linoleic / Linolenic Acids / Phospholipids What they do: These fatty acids replenish the skin´s intercellular matrix, preserving its appearance. In addition, all of them function as cell-communicating ingredients, working to "tell" the appropriate skin cells how to function in a healthier manner. They also help reduce inflammation, believed to be a key factor in how the skin ages. Sources: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, October 2007, pages 1225-1231; Archives of Dermatological Research, July 1998, pages 375-381; Clinical and Experimental Dermatology, March 1998, pages 56-58; Journal of Investigative Dermatology, May 1996, pages 1096-1101, and July 2001, pages 44-51; Seminars in Dermatology, June 1992, pages 169-175; and www.naturaldatabase.com. Please see the list below for product recommendations with linoleic/linolenic acids and/or phospholipids. The A-List: Recommended Products AHA and BHA (Topical Exfoliants) Paula´s Choice 8% Alpha Hydroxy Acid Gel, for All Skin Types ($18.95 for 4 ounces) Derma E AHA Alpha Hydroxy Acids Beauty Fluid ($16.95 for 2 ounces) DHC Renewing AHA Cream ($39 for 1.5 ounces) Dr. Perry Night Skin Active Skin Renewal ($69.95 for 1 ounce) Jason Natural New Cell Therapy 12½ Plus Moisturizing Oil Free Gel ($22.50 for 1 ounce) Peter Thomas Roth Glycolic Acid 10% Moisturizer ($45 for 2 ounces) Vivite Vibrance Therapy ($119 for 1 ounce) Neutrogena Oil-Free Acne Stress Control 3-in-1 Hydrating Acne Treatment ($7.99 for 2 ounces) Paula´s Choice 1% Beta Hydroxy Acid Gel ($18.95 for 4 ounces) Paula´s Choice 1% Beta Hydroxy Acid Lotion ($18.95 for 4 ounces) Paula´s Choice 2% Beta Hydroxy Acid Gel ($18.95 for 4 ounces) Paula´s Choice 2% Beta Hydroxy Acid Liquid ($18.95 for 4 ounces) Paula´s Choice CLEAR Targeted Acne Relief Toner $18.95 for 4 ounces) Paula´s Choice CLEAR Extra Strength Targeted Acne Relief Toner ($18.95 for 4 ounces) ProActiv Solution Clarifying Night Cream ($28.75 for 1 ounce) Cosmedicine Speedy Recovery Acne Treatment Daytime Blemish Lotion SPF 15 ($40 for 2 ounces) Retinol SkinCeuticals Retinol 0.5 Refining Night Cream with 0.5% Pure Retinol ($50 for 1 ounce) SkinCeuticals Retinol 1.0 Maximum Strength Refining Night Cream with 1.0% Pure Retinol ($56 for 1 ounce) Paula´s Choice Skin Balancing Super Antioxidant Mattifying Concentrate Serum ($24.95 for 1 ounce) Paula´s Choice Skin Recovery Super Antioxidant Concentrate Serum ($24.95 for 1 ounce) Paula´s Choice Resist Barrier Repair Moisturizer ($22.95 for 1.7 ounces) Philosophy eye believe, deep wrinkle peptide gel ($30 for 0.5 ounce) Alpha Hydrox Retinol Night ResQ ($14.99 for 1.05 ounces) Neutrogena Healthy Skin Anti-Wrinkle Cream, Night ($13.99 for 1.4 ounces) Vitamin C MD Skincare by Dr. Dennis Gross Hydra-Pure Vitamin C Serum ($95 for 1 ounce) DDF C3 Plus Serum ($68 for 0.5 ounce) La Roche-Posay BioMedic Potent-C 10.5 Concentrate ($72.50 for 1 ounce) SkinCeuticals C E Ferulic ($138 for 1 ounce) Paula´s Choice Resist Super Antioxidant Concentrate Serum ($24.95 for 1 ounce) Jan Marini Skin Research C-ESTA Serum ($79 for 1 ounce) Cellex-C Serum for Sensitive Skin ($90 for 1 ounce) Vitamin E Jason Natural Ester-C Lotion Anti-Oxidant Regenerating Moisturizer ($16 for 4 ounces) NeoStrata Daytime Protection Cream SPF 15, PHA 10 ($36 for 1.75 ounces) Paula´s Choice Skin Recovery Toner ($15.95 for 6 ounces) Paula´s Choice Skin Recovery Moisturizer ($18.95 for 2 ounces) Paula´s Choice Skin Balancing Moisture Gel ($18.95 for 2 ounces) RevaleSkin Night Cream ($110 for 1.7 ounces) Dermalogica AGE Smart Multi-Vitamin Power Firm, for Eye and Lip Area ($48 for 0.5 ounce) Artistry by Amway Time Defiance Skin Refinishing Lotion ($48.50 for 1 ounce) DHC Wrinkle Filler ($27 for 0.52 ounce) Niacinamide Olay Total Effects 7-in-1 Anti-Aging Moisturizer, Mature Skin Therapy ($19.38 for 1.7 ounces) Olay Regenerist Daily Regenerating Serum Fragrance-Free ($19.49 for 1.7 ounces) Olay Regenerist Advanced Anti-Aging DNA Superstructure UV Cream SPF 25 ($29.99 for 1.7 ounces) Paula´s Choice Skin Balancing Toner ($15.95 for 6 ounces) Paula´s Choice Moisture Boost Hydrating Treatment Cream ($18.95 for 2 ounces) Paula´s Choice Skin Balancing Moisture Gel ($18.95 for 2 ounces) Mary Kay TimeWise Even Complexion Essence ($35 for 1 ounce) Nia24 Skin Strengthening Complex ($85 for 1.7 ounces) Normal to Oily Skin SkinCeuticals Physical UV Defense SPF 30 ($37 for 3 ounces) Avon Anew Advanced All-in-One Max SPF 15 Lotion ($16.50 for 1.7 ounces) Peter Thomas Roth Uber-Dry Sunscreen Cream SPF 30 ($26 for 4.3 ounces) Neutrogena Healthy Skin Visibly Even Daily SPF 15 Moisturizer ($13.09 for 1.7 ounces) Paula´s Choice Skin Balancing Daily Mattifying Lotion with SPF 15 and Antioxidants for Normal to Oily/Combination Skin ($20.95 for 2 ounces) Paula´s Choice Essential Non-Greasy Sunscreen SPF 15 for Normal to Oily/Combination Skin($14.95 for 6 ounces) Paula´s Choice Ultra-Light Weightless Finish SPF 30 Sunscreen Spray for All Skin Types($15.95 for 4 ounces) Estee Lauder DayWear Plus Multi Protection Anti-Oxidant Lotion SPF 15, for Oily Skin ($39.50 for 1.7 ounces) Olay Regenerist UV Defense Regenerating Lotion SPF 50 ($29.99 for 1.7 ounces) Sunscreen Actives for Normal to Dry Skin BeautiControl Cell Block-C New Cell Protection SPF 20 ($30.50 for 1 ounce) Elizabeth Arden Extreme Conditioning Cream SPF 15 ($38.50 for 1.7 ounces) Good Skin All Bright Moisturizing Sunscreen SPF 30 ($14 for 1.7 ounces) Mary Kay TimeWise Day Solution Sunscreen SPF 25 ($30 for 1 ounce) Paula´s Choice Extra Care Moisturizing Sunscreen SPF 30+, for Normal to Dry Skin ($14.95 for 6 ounces) Paula´s Choice Skin Recovery Daily Moisturizing Lotion with SPF 15 & Antioxidants for Normal to Dry Skin ($20.95 for 2 ounces) Jan Marini Skin Research Bioglycolic Facial Lotion SPF 15 ($52 for 2 ounces) SkinCeuticals Sports UV Defense SPF 45 ($37 for 3 ounces) Borghese Crema Straordinaria Da Giornio SPF 25 ($66 for 1.7 ounces) Clinique Sun SPF 30 Face Cream ($17.50 for 1.7 ounces) Sunscreen Actives for Sensitive Skin Clinique City Block Sheer Oil-Free Daily Face Protector SPF 25 ($17.50 for 1.4 ounces) Dr. Perry Natural Block 100% Mineral Sunscreen SPF 30 ($19.95 for 4 ounces) Good Skin All Calm Gentle Sunscreen SPF 25 ($14 for 1.7 ounces) Paula´s Choice Pure Mineral Sunscreen SPF 15 ($15.95 for 6 ounces) Paula´s Choice Barely There Sheer Matte Tint SPF 20 ($14.95 for 1 ounce) Obagi Nu-Derm Physical UV Block SPF 32 ($40 for 2 ounces) Boscia Illuminating UVA/UVB SPF 30 ($30 for 1.7 ounces) BeautiControl Cell Block-C New Cell Protection SPF 20 ($30.50 for 1 ounce) Green/White Tea Good Skin All Firm Rebuilding Serum ($26 for 1 ounce) Mary Kay SPF 30 Sunscreen ($14 for 4 ounces) Olay Complete Ageless Skin Renewing UV Lotion SPF 20 ($24.99 for 2.5 ounces) Paula´s Choice BHA products (various formulas ($18.95 for 4 ounces) Paula´s Choice Resist Super Antioxidant Concentrate Serum($24.95 for 1 ounce) Paula´s Choice Moisture Boost Hydrating Toner ($15.95 for 6 ounces) Paula´s Choice Healthy Skin Refreshing Toner ($15.95 for 6 ounces) DERMAdoctor KP Duty Dermatologist Moisturizing Therapy for Dry Skin ($36 for 4 ounces) M.D. Formulations Critical Care Calming Gel ($39 for 1 ounce) SkinMedica Solar Care Environmental Defense Sunscreen SPF 30+ ($40 for 3 ounces) Resveratrol Cellex-C Advanced-C Serum ($127 for 1 ounce) Cosmedicine MegaDose Skin Fortifying Serum ($85 for 1 ounce) Isomers Carnosine + Antioxidant Complex ($39.99 for 1 ounce) Serious Skin Care DNA Eye Beauty Treatment Cream ($22.50 for 0.5 ounce) Aloette Multi-Active Prevention Plus ($49.95 for 0.5 ounce) Grape Seed Dr. Denese New York Triple Strength Wrinkle Smoother ($54 for 2 ounces) MD Skincare by Dr. Dennis Gross Hydra-Pure Antioxidant Firming Serum ($95 for 1 ounce) Paula´s Choice Moisture Boost Hydrating Toner for Normal to Dry Skin ($15.95 for 6 ounces) Paula´s Choice 2% Beta Hydroxy Acid Lotion (18.95 for 4 ounces) Revlon Age Defying Instant Firming Face Primer for Dry Skin ($13.99 for 1 ounce) Revlon Age Defying Instant Firming Face Primer for Normal/Combination Skin ($13.99 for 1 ounce) Curcuminoids Avon Anew Advanced All-in-One Max SPF 15 Lotion ($16.50 for 1.7 ounces) BeautiControl Skinlogics Platinum Plus Brightening Day Crème ($26 for 3.5 ounces) Paula's Choice Resist Barrier Repair Moisturizer ($22.95 for 1.7 ounces) Paula’s Choice Resist Super Antioxidant Concentrate Serum ($24.95 for 1 ounce) Paula’s Choice Skin Recovery Super Antioxidant Concentrate Serum ($24.95 for 1 ounce) Soy Isoflavones/Extract DDF Silky C Serum ($78 for 1 ounce) MD Skincare by Dr. Dennis Gross Hydra-Pure Antioxidant Firming Serum ($95 for 1 ounce) MD Skincare by Dr. Dennis Gross Hydra-Pure Oil-Free Moisture ($78 for 1 ounce) Paula´s Choice Skin Recovery Super Antioxidant Concentrate Serum($24.95 for 1 ounce) Paula´s Choice Skin Recovery Hydrating Treatment Mask ($14.95 for 4 ounces) Estee Lauder Advanced Night Repair Concentrate Recovery Boosting Treatment ($85 for 1 ounce) Pomegranate Borba Clarifying Complexion Shield SPF 15 ($25 for 3.4 ounces) Estee Lauder Nutritious Vita-Mineral Radiance Serum ($40 for 1 ounce) Estee Lauder Advanced Night Repair Concentrate Recovery Boosting Treatment ($85 for 1 ounce) Murad Energizing Pomegranate Moisturizer SPF 15 ($33 for 2 ounces) Paula´s Choice Resist Barrier Repair Moisturizer ($22.95 for 1.7 ounces) Paula´s Choice HydraLight Moisture-Infusing Lotion, for Normal to Oily/Combination Skin ($18.95 for 2 ounces) Ceramides CeraVe Moisturizing Lotion ($12.99 for 12 ounces) CeraVe Moisturizing Cream ($14.99 for 16 ounces) Elizabeth Arden Ceramide Gold Ultra Restorative Capsules ($68 for 0.95 ounce) Isomers Absolutes Anti Redness Serum ($29.99 for 1 ounce) MD Formulations Moisture Defense Antioxidant Lotion ($50 for 1 ounce) Paula´s Choice Hydrating Treatment Cream ($18.95 for 2 ounces) Paula´s Choice Skin Balancing Toner ($15.95 for 6 ounces) Osmotics Cream Extreme Barrier Repair ($75 for 1.7 ounces) SkinCeuticals Retinol 0.5 Refining Night Cream with 0.5% Pure Retinol ($42 for 1 ounce) Lineolic/Lineolic Acids/Phosopholipids Bobbi Brown Intensive Skin Supplement ($65 for 1 ounce) Clinique Repairwear Deep Wrinkle Concentrate for Face and Eyes ($55 for 1 ounce) Dr. Denese New York HydroShield Eye Serum ($44 for 0.5 ounce) Estee Lauder DayWear Plus Multi Protection Anti-Oxidant Lotion SPF 15, for Oily Skin ($39.50 for 1.7 ounces) Good Skin Tri-Aktiline Instant Deep Wrinkle Filler ($39.50 for 1 ounce) Kiss My Face Face Factor Face + Neck SPF 30 ($12.95 for 2 ounces) M.D. Formulations Moisture Defense Antioxidant Lotion ($50 for 1 ounce) M.A.C. Prep + Prime Line Filler ($19.50 for 0.5 ounce) Paula´s Choice Moisture Boost Hydrating Treatment Cream, for Normal to Dry Skin ($18.95 for 2 ounces) Paula´s Choice Moisture Boost Hydrating Toner for Normal to Dry Skin ($15.95 for 6 ounces)
  8. I had heard that obviously these people are taking note of public sentiment which is strongly anti-gun too, especially in the aftermath of the Tucson tragedy. (Recent surveys have supported this point & are available if someone wishes to dispute the point) The tragic fact was the assault weapons ban enacted in 1994 (with the support of Ronald Reagan I might add) had been allowed to expire during the GW Bush administration. It is a fact that the accused killer, Jared Laughner had a weapon with a 30 round capacity, which had been illegal prior to the assault weapons ban expiring and is currently illegal to possess in California today. This kind of insanity must stop. If Jared Laughner had not had this type of clip who knows if the carnage would have been as high as it was. While the NRA had publicly issued a statement of condolences privately it is reported that the NRA is gearing up for a major backlash against assault weapons which will hopefully be permanently banned. and as this thread stated gun owners who wish to purchase this type of weapon and clip are thinking it will happen too.
  9. I had always heard that red wine was helpful if consumed moderately (as in drinking it). It contains an antioxidant called Resveratrol which is supposed to be helpful. However applying it topically as a mask or something doesn't seem to make any logical sense and isn't large amount of alcohol in skin products supposed to be bad? (wine has much more alcohol content than beer btw) Just wondering.. I do suppose you get the added benefit of your skin smelling like a winery... Isn't that attractive?
  10. The National Rifle Association (NRA) should go away. Their priorities and their undue influence in American Government is soooo counterproductive in today's society.
  11. Julia Roberts? Do you mean the Julia Roberts? welcome btw
  12. good point if it is similar to a printer why not put all fingers from a hand in there? wonder what kind of "ink" they use to put the patterns on the nails
  13. that looks pretty wild. i googled it and even found a video of it in action. Go to http://www.engadget.com/2011/01/10/artpro-nail-printer-v6-1-hands-in-video?icid=sphere_blogsmith_inpage_engadget Hmmm i still doubt it will put all those nail salons stocked with Chinese women out of business! It may be available at high end salons who have the bucks and want something unique.
  14. Johnnie, its interesting you mentioned the financial motivation as a reason for promoting vaccines. Its that same point that is being directed at Dr. Wakefield as his motivation for creating this linkage between Autism and vaccination. There were financial considerations as part of a big law suit. If you're questioning the motivation of Doctors affiliated with drug manufacturing companies etc then why not keep the United States out of the discussion. Take a look a countries with public health systems, like Canada or the UK and these countries (not beholden to the United States) clearly think that it makes sense from a public health standpoint to recommend vaccinations against some very deadly diseases that used to be prevalent. I think it is still a valid decision to recommend vaccinations even if it were true that vaccinations caused autism (which has never been proven) just because it would always be better to be alive with Autism than dead with some of these horrendous diseases that we are routinely vaccinated for. Emily, in answer to your question Jenny McCarthy was asked about her response and she declined to comment.
  15. another great hoax, besides why would anyone pay for something they could get for free put this in the category of poo skin care
  16. I've heard of some of those harsh treatments (vinegar or alchohol) and even Windex! It was also a common myth that sex (too little or maybe too much) was also a cause. I remember when i was a teen i was told it was too much chocolate although i never ate too much or greasy foods (Stupid parents). I was also scrubbing my face until the acne was very sore which i learn much later was very bad for the condition but somehow i felt better for it. Luckily my daughter barely got it and my son in just a few spots. The treatments today seem so much better. I just find it strange that the strongest treatment available these days, Accutane is constantly being hawked on TV for all this other ailments it may cause and hey why don't you join this class action lawsuit some lawyer has going on.
  17. dumb question but what is VIB?
  18. kind of assumed with a name like that you would have at least one :-)
  19. you are so correct, diseases that were supposedly eradicated such as Polio are making a comeback
  20. I think this new information is relevant http://www.makeuptalk.com/forum/thread/114116/doctor-behind-study-linking-vaccine-to-autism-accused-of-deliberate-fraud#post_1734208
  21. not exactly the kind of first date anyone would expect i would think
  22. hmm this story should be linked to those threads where people cited this as a reason they didn't want their kids vaccinated or those people that refuse to get a flu vaccine. Rather foolish

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