Jump to content

ameliacandco

Members
  • Content Count

    30
  • Joined

  • Last visited

    Never

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About ameliacandco

  • Rank
    Trainee

About

  • About Me
    Array
  • My Occupation
    Array
  • Custom Links
    Array
  • Car I Drive
    Array
  • My Favorite Movies
    Array
  • Favorite Music
    Array
  • Favorite Books
    Array
  • My Favorite Makeup Brands
    Array
  • One Interesting Fact About Me
    Array
  • My Facebook URL
    Array
  • My Twitter URL
    Array
  • My YouTube Channel
    Array
  1. Your on the right path by reaching out and asking... however... you'd be better served looking up local MUA's in your area and contacting them directly. Be prepared to be turned down a lot though. It's a BIG RISK for an MUA to bring along an assistant to a gig- everything that you could do wrong and ruin our gig runs through our minds. I only take on assistants I have a relationship with, someone who would have something to lose if they screwed up. But, you have to start somewhere! So take the risk and get out there. Just don't boohoo too much if you find people won't even let you work for free.
  2. On the job and at home, I use Cinema Secrets for my day-to-day cleaning. Every month or so, you gotta really do a deep deep clean and that's when I reach for my London Brush Co Shampoo- I am obsessed with this stuff and it makes my brushes smell like fresh baked lemon muffins! http://www.londonbrushcompany.com/#!product/prd1/781428811/pure-goat-milk-and-essential-oil-brush-shampoo-1oz
  3. Beautiful people, I need your stories! I am currently creating a blog for professional HMUA's. Yes, I know that makeup hobbyists will be able to see it, but the content will be truly developed for professionals. Heavy on the business info, heavy on the resource and product info, not so much on the makeup reviews and the tutorials. I'm putting together a section just for laughs called "tales from the chair". I want your funniest, sweetest, craziest, scariest, most heart warming stories! Â All stories will be edited to keep the clients info anonymous, and you will have the option of posting anonymously or with credits. So, if you have a story to tell (and I know you do!) please email your story.Also, when the beta site launches, you'll get first look at it to test it out and tell me what you think! xoxo! Personal info removed. . Please see TOS
  4. ameliacandco

    Help!!

    I don't think neutrals are the issue, and I don't think you look dead and tired- I think you look dull. As in, your makeup is just kind of not there and washed out and there's nothing fresh or vibrant. You can put all the color in the world on your face but until you correct that problem, you'll still have the same effect. I opened up your attached image and zoomed in for a closer look. Here's my thoughts: Your skin, oily as it may be, is lovely. Ditch the foundation and powder, opt for a bb cream over a primer. Get a cream blush and and cream bronzer. You need light and life, powdery products will just dull you down. Your eyes are very similar to mine- they are so round and large it takes a gallon of makeup to look like there's something going on. Brighten your eyes up with some simmer in the inner half of your upper lid, and then learn how to do individual false lashes and layer those baby's up. Keep your shadow simple, just blend some of that creamy bronzer into your crease. A pop of coral or bright pink liquid lipstick would be wonderful to brighten up your look.
  5. the thing is this... There are lots of talented makeup artists who are broke. And there are lots of mediocre makeup artists that are well employed. You have to be a business person AND a makeup artist if your going to be a free lance artist. If you can find someone to assist, that would be ideal, but going it alone and trying to make it work is nearly impossible, no matter how great you are. A strong set of business skills is an absolute must for any free lancer. If your really trying to do makeup for a living, I would recommend auditioning for one of the lines- you can make a decent hourly wage anywhere between 20-30 per hour, and the work is more consistent. Not to mention you don't have to deal with the stress of running your own business. I have an agency with five artists that work for me, and that's because they do not want to run their own business but still want to be free lance artists. You could find an agency to work for too, but agency owners tend to be extremely picky since it's OUR name on the line. I have enough work to keep 7 artists busy, but I'd rather turn away a little work than to have less than exceptional artists.
  6. Not sure if she'll get this, it looks like she's only had one post since last Sept and that was it, but my two cents... I own an artist agency, and it seems like every other Tuesday there's a new "makeup artist" who wants to do weddings. And at least a few times a month, I get a call from a hysterical bride who had some kind of major issue- artist was terrible, didn't show, had no professionalism... so on and so forth. I'm not trying to be rude, I'm trying to point out the reality of the situation. Before you start worrying about how much your going to charge, you need to develop a system, both as a makeup artist and as a business owner. To us, weddings happen every day, but to the bride, it's HER big day. That photo she'll hang on a wall for 50 or more years. It's the photo her grandkids are going to see. It will be in her family albums, and the albums of all her friends and family that she invites. It will go on the internet, in wallets, on iPhone screens and in scrapbooks. You better be damn sure you know what your doing, both as a professional and as a makeup artist, because it' is a BIG deal to be invited to create the look a woman will have of herself hanging on a wall for years and years to come.
  7. I prefer the new Revolution set endorsed by Keven James Bennett. The brush heads are made of synthetic fibers but are designed for both wet and try applications. The acrylic handle has a soft grip but does not warp during cleaning, like most wooden handles do. The bristles are fused together at the base for no shedding. Make sure you get the flat-head buffing brush- that's my go to for buffing foundation in for a flawless skin appearance!
  8. The goal with foundation is not to change their inherit skin tone. The goal of foundation is to even everything out, generally matching from the decollete up. (And to shape, I contour with liquid foundation for a flawless skin-like finish.) If they are sallow, then they are sallow. You wouldn't want a pink-toned head bobbling around on a olive toned body. You'd see a line of demarcation and it would look off. So your not correcting the skin tone, your matching it and then of course correcting redness, blemishes, ect.
  9. Olive = Drab. It is neither cool nor warm. Green or Gray undertones will match better. When I have a client with super olive skin, for example an Asian ethnicity, I always put a drop of 185 into whatever foundation I'm mixing for her. (Makeup Forever HD). It's not enough to darken the foundation, but black/grey is the base of that color and will drab out any warm or cool tones in the lighter foundation colors. You can also check out their new additive line and get some pure green or gray pigment to add to concealers or foundations to drab down. HD Foundation also works wonders as a concealer. Simply apply foundation to the face, then dab a second layer on with fingertips under the eyes for a think but opaque coverage with diffused edges.
  10. Hair doesn't grow darker because you shave it. The reasons why it appears darker is because there is more surface of each individual hair that the eye sees. When hair grows, the end is tapered- so the very tip of the strand is nearly microscopic. When you shave hair, your creating a blunt end, which means that instead of tapering off you now have a very rounded end that the naked eye sees more. So it merely appears darker. Now, there is some truth to hair growing back thicker due to shaving, but that is because the action of moving a razor up and down the skin stimulates your nerves, muscles, follicles, sebaceous glands, etc (basically, gives them a work out) and that stimulates hair growth, similar to tilling a garden. However, how much it actually stimulates it is nominal. That's why waxing, laser, and threading are better options because they rip the hair out of the follicle rather than blunt it or stimulate the skin too often. Using an eyebrow shaper to remove peach fuzz on the face is not a bad idea, as it's a form of dermaplaning. Dermaplaning is an obscure technique not widely known that derms and esti's do occasionally to rid the face of the superficial skin cells. Think of it as awesome exfoliation. I don't rec commend using a shaper for brows or upper lip, however.
  11. Has gone by and all I've managed was a shower... because I have never, ever heard of these sub boxes and have spent the entire morning going through each and every post looking up what you all are subbed to! Holy Chanel I need it all and I need it all RIGHT NOW! Before I cause marital strife with 20 different subs, I need to know: What is your TOP 1) Beauty 2) Food 3)Lifestyle sub? And this whole time I'm kicking myself for not knowing this in Oct when I was doing my Christmas shopping- boxes for all!!!! Now spill the goods ladies so I can get in on this sub action! xoxo
  • NARS Cosmetics Shop Cargo Cosmetics Today!

About MakeupTalk®

© 2003-2018 MakeupTalk.com®, an active online community and message board geared towards members wanting to discuss everything to do with makeup, cosmetics, product reviews, monthly subscription boxes and general beauty related topics. Our community provides product reviews, makeup and general beauty tips. Our most popular topics are subscription boxes and their monthly spoilers. Join our community for free to take part in the conversations and share your own beauty tips and product reviews with others. We look forward to seeing you online here at Makeuptalk®!

MakeupTalk® Facebook

×