Breast Lumps/Cysts/Fibroids?

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Just curious, does anyone else here suffer from breast lumps, cysts, or fibroids? I've got something in my right breast that I need to get checked out - went for a mammogram under the recommendation of my doctor, but the clinic wouldn't even bother because I'm not "at risk," and they said I need to have an ultrasound done first to see whether I even need a mammogram. This lump is a result of the birth control pill screwing up my body in many ways - just one of the side effects. I'm upset because I'm a healthy person, and now this has me terrified. I've got no history or family history of breast problems, was completely healthy before the pill messed me up (still need to post about that). I've heard that if the lump moves, it's most likely not cancerous, and mine is like a marble. It sometimes hurts, though. My mother-in-law also has some cysts, and she said they sometimes just hurt and annoy. A lady at our church told me she has had the same problem for many many years, and she always took a certain vitiamin that helped with the discomfort, but I can't remember what it was she recommended. Vitamin E perhaps? Does anyone have any similar experiences?

 
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Originally Posted by *BrownEyedGirl* I'm so sorry you are having these problems! I don't suffer from cysts or fibroids myself, so I can't be of help. It kind of sounds like a fibroid. Here's a link:
http://my.webmd.com/hw/health_guide_...?navbar=hw3791

A suspicious lump should not be brushed off. That clinic was wrong for not performing the mammogram. Go back to the dr and *demand* to get a prescription, order, or whatever to go to a clinic, hospital, or whatever facility you need to go to have a sonogram or mammogram. Please keep us informed!!

Thanks so much for the link - that's exactly what my doctor (ex-doctor) thinks it is. He's the one who sent me to the mammogram place, but once I got there, this ensued (I wrote this in an email to a friend):
Well, my gynecologist is a psycho. I was at the mammogram place (different location than my OBGYN, all in the little dressing gown and everything, and then the girl came in and said they couldn't do it because they're only supposed to do routine mammograms, and my doctor shouldn't have referred me there in the first place. She said I should have been referred to a radiologist for an ultrasound, to rule out whether or not its a cyst or <META-DATA.TITLE>Fibroadenoma</META-DATA.TITLE>, and then if it was something more, then I'd go for a mammogram.

So now I'm definitely changing doctors, because this is the last straw from this guy who has already messed up before. And I need to call the gyn's office to find out when they can schedule me at the hospital for an ultrasound. My poor hubby was ticked off because he took off work to take me over there, and we wasted an hour. He doesn't understand why they didn't just do it since I was there, but I guess it wasn't their fault. They were going to do it, and even tried making an appointment for me at the hospital for the ultrasound, but they were booked up.

So, that was the story. All of that happenedm right around when we were getting ready to move. Now that we've moved, I'm planning an appointment very soon. Thanks for your encouragement and for keeping on me about this. I need accountability - that's for sure.


 
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yes definitely change doctors! That's so wrong! I know some women who have had cysts and they say that they are painful and the pain comes and goes. Just because you are not at risk doesn't mean it should be ignored by the doctors. I've heard that breast cancer has been missed several times when a mom is nursing because the doctor thinks it's something caused by nursing because the symptoms are similar. For example a plugged milk duct etc. Keep pressing the doctors on getting a mammogram just to be safe. I don't personally trust doctor's because of my medical history and I've learned that they don't do much of anything unless you really stay on top of it as a patient and do your own research. That's why I love the internet because you can find so much info on your own. Keep us posted on how it's going and I hope you can get it to have it checked out ASAP.

 
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Can be caused by too much caffeine, too much calcium that isn't being metabolized, a sluggish liver & lymphatic system overall. See Archived newsletters on t-tapp.com forums. In 1986 my doc at the time told me to stop drinking coffee (& whatever else like chocolate has caffeine in it) & lo & behold, in less than a month, they disappeared. I also have learned how important dry brushing the skin is for lymphatic drainage which affects lumps, cellulite (lumps below) & generally poor elimination. The skin is the third lung, the bosom is completely lymphatic, & x-rays can often mis-read muscle tissue that's stuck to itself from overtraining, injury, wear & tear, etc.

 
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Originally Posted by GR8FISCH Can be caused by too much caffeine, too much calcium that isn't being metabolized, a sluggish liver & lymphatic system overall. See Archived newsletters on t-tapp.com forums. In 1986 my doc at the time told me to stop drinking coffee (& whatever else like chocolate has caffeine in it) & lo & behold, in less than a month, they disappeared. I also have learned how important dry brushing the skin is for lymphatic drainage which affects lumps, cellulite (lumps below) & generally poor elimination. The skin is the third lung, the bosom is completely lymphatic, & x-rays can often mis-read muscle tissue that's stuck to itself from overtraining, injury, wear & tear, etc. I know for a fact that my lump was caused from the birth control pill Yasmin. I've never been a big caffeine person - the most I've ever had was a cup of tea per day, and I don't even do that daily. In fact, I don't even drink as much tea since I've been married (my mom and I always dranl lots of tea together), and I noticed this lump during a time when birth control was messing up a lot of other things in my body as well. (I almost bled to death a year ago.) The high levels of estrogen in birth control hormones are not good for our bodies, as we actually need more progesterone (sp? progestin), not estrogen.
Indeed, I've cut back much more on caffeine in the last 2 years, and yet this lump appeared last summer. I'm not the only person who's been affected this way by birth control, either. It's actually quite common. I've also got fibroids on my cervix, from the pill. I've always been a healthy person, and only a few months after beginning the pill, I became ill in all sorts of ways.

I do appreciate your findings, though, GR8. Very helpful - I wish that cutting more caffeine could make mine go away.


 
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Sorry it took so long to get back to you. I apologize if I sounded flip, wasn't intended, as I know the pill is a problem. Dr. Sandra Cabot's site for natural hormone therapy may be helpful for you (if I've already mentioned it, sorry again): www.sandracabot.com.

 
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I've had a TOM every 6 months or so for about a year & a half. For the past 2-3 years, I upped the Essential Fatty Acids for hormone balancing to prevent killer cramps. What I took & still take today, although since I've begun using Teresa Tapps' Total Workout System (www.t-tapp.com), I can feel a balance going on to where I truly forget to take my supplements, but here's what I've found works (done lots of research & been my own lab rat): 1-2G/day of each: organic flaxseed oil, evening primrose oil or borage oil, fish oil, Vit. C complex with bioflavanoids, MSM; 400 - 800 IU's natural Vit. E Complex; Whole Foods Market MCHA mineral complex as directed, Country Life Bone & Nerve Osteo support as directed; food grown Vit. B complex (Nature's Plus); one week prior to & the week of TOM, 50m extra Vit. B6, 1-2 caps of 30mg 5-HTP for natural serotonin (instead of the dreaded Prozac or Paxil), NO CHICKEN & ALL ITS RELATIVES & BEEF/DAIRY PRODUCTS UNLESS ORGANIC, NO ANTI-BIOTICS, ADDED HORMONES, PRESERVATIVES, COLORINGS, NITRATES, NITRITES, ADDED SALT OR SUGAR. The liver can't process the overabundance of our own cycle & the compounded problems with added foods; it overloads & everything goes berserk. Use fish, turkey, organic chicken & eggs, natural grain-free fed beef (grains have junk in them & they are made fat eating them so guess what happens to us...see www.drmercola.com), cheese, etc., live culture full-fat yoghurt, natural organic local (within a 50 mile radius of where YOU live) honey or Grade D maple syrup, brown rice if you like rice, spelt (no glutens if you are carb sensitive or white flour stuff which spikes insulin & overloads the lymph system on top of the liver), LOTS of good water, green tea, lemonade, soups, raw almonds (the harder the nut the higher the protein - to cut sugar cravings - the softer the nut the higher the fat/carb) & nut butters, greens, seaweeds (for natural minerals, iodine, sodium), & naturally fermented pickles, umeboshi plums, cabbage, etc. Is it complicated? Maybe in the beginning. But I'll say this, I have no weird symptoms, 75% reduced PMS moodiness, sleep great (use melatonin 1-2x/month if needed - 3mg), cut food cravings & yep, we women do get better as we get older...as long as we do a little prevention. Dr. Lee's work is excellent. Started using a progesterone cream as directed last March (2003) & it helped, but I keep forgetting to use it....bec. I don't need it for now. Fanie Intl. skincare ([email protected] for info on what you need for skin type) from the outside feeds the skin which also helps normalize lymph systems & eases up the liver/gallbladder elimination functions, as do essential oils (www.younglivingworld.com).

 
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Wow - thanks ladies! Lots to read up on here! I don't have time to properly respond right now, but will do so first chance I get!!! Thanks sooo very much!


 
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You're right - don't mess around - there's a great deal we can do for prevention, whether we're at risk or not. I've never had a mammogram (neither has my 73 yr old Mom)& I don't smoke, though DH does...do skin brushing, the vitamins thing, water & workout routines...I can do an internal body scan & "see" what is off-kilter...been applying that to my spiritual body recently...definitely need to practice on this til it's as efficient. What that leads to is, if you're sensing something, go with it...better to err on the side of caution.

 
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Nothing to update at the moment. We've just recently moved, so I haven't had a chance to get checked again yet. I'm hoping to have everything checked out in the next few weeks though, because my parents are coming to visit for a few weeks, and my husband and I have got a lot happening this summer. I want to get all of this over with so that I can relax the rest of the summer and enjoy all of our plans.

If it's just a fibroid, I've heard it doesn't even really have to be removed. I'd kind of like it to be, just so I don't have to feel it, but it's an expensive thing to have taken out. My mother-in-law has them, and she didn't get them removed.

I have fibroids on my cervix, as well, which unless they've dissolved since I've been off the pill, I need to get them checked out. My husband and I are considering trying to have a baby very soon, so I want everything to be in order for that.


Will update when I have news. Thanks for everyone's kind thoughts.


Originally Posted by naturally Update?
Was rereading your post ...that just gets me. My best friend had a lump ..she was told NOT to worry about it for years (past 4). She's of the philosophy if it doesn't belong ..get rid of it. She went to see a surgeon ..female doc and she didn't seem too concerned either ...my friend read her the riot act ..saying she was just one of those "Good Ol' Boys" (male docs that don't care too much about womens breasts) ...that got the doc thinking and they set up a date for surgery. Then the lump started getting smaller or moved. But went ahead with the surgery anyhow. To the day the doc went in to do the surgery, she still was only "doing it for my friend" ...well guess what ...it had the characteristics to be cancerous ..like a pre something or other ..and the doctor told my friend she was sorry that that changed her outlook to NOT say don't worry about it ...cause now my friend is in a higher percentile for possibly getting breast cancer.

Push that envelope when it comes to getting answers ..if it's Just a fibroid ..can it be removed/biopsied? We work with a woman that was told same thing .."Don't Worry" ..she's now one of those "Survivors" of breast cancer.

I'm not trying to scare you ..seriously ...but when it comes to our breasts ..well our health for that matter ..WE have to be our own advocates! Push the issue ..get answers ..and as for the clinic turning you away ..keep pushing on that also.

Hope all is well!

 
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BC pills will do it. I have lumps also but they are from calicum build up, cause my hormones are screwed up big time. I wouldn't worry about it unless it is really painful.

 
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Last week I spent several days trying to make a few appointments for a breast check, an ultrasound on said-breast, and my annual women's wellness exam. I finally got an appointment for a nurse practitioner to look at my breasts today! Yay!

She felt the lump in my right breast, and said it felt most like a cyst, with the slight possibility of being a fibroadenoma. From what I've read, it seems more likely to be a cyst. She gave me a prescription for an ultrasound, and we got an appointment for that to be done on July 2nd. She referred me to a particular center where she said I'd walk out pretty much knowing what's up, which would be reassuring. She mentioned that if they think it's an adenoma, I may need a biopsy, so I'm not looking forward to that, but "que sera, sera." I really am inclined to believe it's a cyst, though. The symptoms sound on-target, as do the causes.

My pastor's wife has fibrocystic breast disease, so she's been very helpful, as has my mother-in-law. It's good to know I'm not alone!

I've got my wellness exam scheduled for next Monday, June 21. Hopefully we'll find out about the growth/shrinkage of my cervical fibroid tumors, and depending on the outcome, we can seriously start considering children! Another yay!

The nurse recommended Vitamin E for the occasional breast discomfort, and I've heard that before - so now I need to go buy some.

Thought I'd just give you all an update as to my conditions! Thanks for all the prayers and positive thoughts!!! Keep 'em coming - I can use them! I'm thinking and hoping everything is alright, and we'll know in a few weeks!



 
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Just a quick update: I went for my breast ultrasound on July 2nd. After the technician did her exam, she had a radiologist come in right after and do the same exam, and then the radiologist proceeded to share her diagnosis with me. I've got a fibroadenoma. "Fibroadenoma is a solid benign lump which does not contain fluid. It may cause discomfort and can become larger over time or if a woman becomes pregnant. Fibroadenomas vary in size, from those which cannot be felt but which may show up on a mammogram to those which are large and can be easily felt. They can be removed surgically if required but can usually be left alone." From: http://www.projectlinks.org/fibroadenoma/ I'll be talking with my gynocologist in the next few days, and we'll talk more about options and such. Still, it was nice being able to know right there, on the spot, with a radiologist. I'm still awaiting the results for my pelvic ultrasound about my fibroids, because there was no radiologist able to come in during that exam, and the technician couldn't say anything.

 
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What is a fibroadenoma?

A fibroadenoma is a benign (non-cancerous) solid lump of tissue. It is thought to result from increased sensitivity to the female hormone oestrogen. It normally has a rubbery texture, is smooth to the touch and moves easily under the skin. For this reason it is sometimes called a 'breast mouse'. A fibroadenoma may be painless, or it can be tender or even painful.

Fibroadenomas are very common and it is not unusual to have more than one. They are mostly found in young women but can occur in women of any age.

Most fibroadenomas are about 1-3cm in size. These are referred to as 'common' fibroadenomas. Occasionally they can grow to more than 5cm in size, and these are called 'giant' fibroadenomas. Fibroadenomas found in teenage girls are referred to as 'juvenile' fibroadenomas.

Most fibroadenomas stay the same size. Some get smaller and some will eventually disappear over time. A small number get bigger and this may be more noticeable during pregnancy and breastfeeding.

Diagnosis

Your GP will usually be able to say whether the lump feels like a fibroadenoma but s/he may refer you to a specialist at a breast clinic for a definite diagnosis.

At the breast clinic you will probably have a triple assessment, which is a breast examination, mammogram (breast x-ray) and a fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), where cells from the lump are drawn off with a fine needle and syringe. In some clinics you may have a core biopsy rather than a FNAC. This is where tissue samples of the lump are taken rather than cells. If you are under the age of 35 you are likely to have an ultrasound scan rather than a mammogram. This is because younger women's breast tissue is too dense to give a good image. For more detailed information about these tests, see our Referral to a breast clinic section.

Treatment

In most cases you will not need any treatment or follow-up once a diagnosis has been confirmed. You will generally only be asked to return to your GP or the breast clinic if the lump gets bigger or becomes painful.

In some circumstances a fibroadenoma may be removed, for example if it is larger than 3cm or if you are particularly anxious about leaving it.

The lump will be removed in a small operation under a general anaesthetic. You may be in hospital just for the day, or overnight, and you will have a small wound with a stitch or stitches in it. When the lump is removed it does not usually affect the shape of the breast, as the normal breast tissue will fill out and make up for it.

What this means for you

You may feel anxious about what having a fibroadenoma means for you. On the one hand you may feel relieved that it is a benign condition, but you may still worry about breast cancer. Having a fibroadenoma does not increase your risk of breast cancer, but it is still important to be breast aware and go back to your GP if you notice any further lumps or other changes. You can find out more about being breast aware in our Breast awareness section.

If you would like further information or support, call our helpline on 0808 800 6000 (textphone 0808 800 6000) or visit www.breastcancercare.org.uk.

The text of this section is taken from Breast Cancer Care's leaflet 'Fibroadenoma' © Breast Cancer Care August 2003.

Source: http://www.breastcancercare.org.uk/Breasthealth/Fibroadenoma

 
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Originally Posted by Kage_sCupotea What is a fibroadenoma?
A fibroadenoma is a benign (non-cancerous) solid lump of tissue. It is thought to result from increased sensitivity to the female hormone oestrogen. It normally has a rubbery texture, is smooth to the touch and moves easily under the skin. For this reason it is sometimes called a 'breast mouse'. A fibroadenoma may be painless, or it can be tender or even painful.

Fibroadenomas are very common and it is not unusual to have more than one. They are mostly found in young women but can occur in women of any age.

Most fibroadenomas are about 1-3cm in size. These are referred to as 'common' fibroadenomas. Occasionally they can grow to more than 5cm in size, and these are called 'giant' fibroadenomas. Fibroadenomas found in teenage girls are referred to as 'juvenile' fibroadenomas.

Most fibroadenomas stay the same size. Some get smaller and some will eventually disappear over time. A small number get bigger and this may be more noticeable during pregnancy and breastfeeding.

Diagnosis

Your GP will usually be able to say whether the lump feels like a fibroadenoma but s/he may refer you to a specialist at a breast clinic for a definite diagnosis.

At the breast clinic you will probably have a triple assessment, which is a breast examination, mammogram (breast x-ray) and a fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), where cells from the lump are drawn off with a fine needle and syringe. In some clinics you may have a core biopsy rather than a FNAC. This is where tissue samples of the lump are taken rather than cells. If you are under the age of 35 you are likely to have an ultrasound scan rather than a mammogram. This is because younger women's breast tissue is too dense to give a good image. For more detailed information about these tests, see our Referral to a breast clinic section.

Treatment

In most cases you will not need any treatment or follow-up once a diagnosis has been confirmed. You will generally only be asked to return to your GP or the breast clinic if the lump gets bigger or becomes painful.

In some circumstances a fibroadenoma may be removed, for example if it is larger than 3cm or if you are particularly anxious about leaving it.

The lump will be removed in a small operation under a general anaesthetic. You may be in hospital just for the day, or overnight, and you will have a small wound with a stitch or stitches in it. When the lump is removed it does not usually affect the shape of the breast, as the normal breast tissue will fill out and make up for it.

What this means for you

You may feel anxious about what having a fibroadenoma means for you. On the one hand you may feel relieved that it is a benign condition, but you may still worry about breast cancer. Having a fibroadenoma does not increase your risk of breast cancer, but it is still important to be breast aware and go back to your GP if you notice any further lumps or other changes. You can find out more about being breast aware in our Breast awareness section.

If you would like further information or support, call our helpline on 0808 800 6000 (textphone 0808 800 6000) or visit www.breastcancercare.org.uk.

The text of this section is taken from Breast Cancer Care's leaflet 'Fibroadenoma' © Breast Cancer Care August 2003.

Source: http://www.breastcancercare.org.uk/Breasthealth/Fibroadenoma

Hi Kages_cupoTea... I was wondering if this post is a result of your findings and dx from the doctor (??)


 
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I love that graphic! Thanks!


Actually, this is a random webpage I googled, but it's an actual reliable medical site. It contains the same basic information as the pamphlet that the radiologist gave me. I haven't yet spoken to my gyn Dr. because she's awaiting the results herself. I should hear from her by the start of next week, though. The radiologist was the basic truth, though. If there had been only the technician doing the ultrasound, then I wouldn't have known the diagnosis. However, since there was a radiologist right there, she was able to share the results as she was doing the ultrasound. It sure was nice being able to walk out of there knowing what exactly my lump is.

Originally Posted by Californian Hi Kages_cupoTea... I was wondering if this post is a result of your findings and dx from the doctor (??)


 
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Here's a little more info that pertains to the fibroadenoma tumor I have.

Source: http://www.chclibrary.org/micromed/00048320.html

<TABLE><TBODY><TR><TD><CENTER>Fibroadenoma

</CENTER>Definition

Fibroadenomas are benign breast tumors commonly found in young women. Fibroadenoma means "a tumor composed of glandular (related to gland) and fibrous (containing fibers) tissues."

Description

Breast fibroadenomas, abnormal growths of glandular and fibrous tissues, are most common between the ages of 15 and 30, and are found in 10% of all women (20% of black women). They are found rarely in postmenopausal women.

Described as feeling like marbles, these firm, round, movable, and "rubbery" lumps range from 1 cm–5 cm in size. Giant fibroadenomas are larger, lemon-sized lumps. Usually single, from 10–15% of women have more than one.

While some types of breast lumps come and go during the menstrual cycle, fibroadenomas typically do not disappear after a woman's period, and should be checked by a doctor.

Causes & symptoms

The cause of breast fibroadenomas is unknown. They may be dependent upon estrogen, because they are common in premenopausal women, can be found in postmenopausal women taking estrogen, and because they grow larger in pregnant women.

Fibroadenomas usually cause no symptoms and may be discovered during breast self-examination, or during a routine check-up.

Diagnosis

When the doctor takes a complete medical history, they will ask when the lump was first noticed, if there were any symptoms or changes in lump size, and if there is any personal or family history of breast disease.

The doctor thoroughly feels the breasts (palpates). Tests are done, usually including mammography or ultrasound scans, or surgical removal of cells or tissue for examination under a the microscope (biopsy).

Diagnostic tests include:

[*]Mammogram. An x-ray examination of the breast.

[*]Ultrasound scan. A technique that uses sound waves to display a two-dimensional image of the breast, showing whether a lump is solid or fluid-filled (cystic).

[*]Fine-needle aspiration biopsy. A minor procedure wherein fluid or cells are drawn out of the lump through a small needle (aspirated).

[*]Core biopsy. A procedure wherein a larger piece of tissue is withdrawn from the lump through a larger needle.

[*]Incisional biopsy. A surgical procedure wherein a piece of the lump is removed through an cut (incision).

[*]Excisional biopsy. A surgical procedure wherein the entire lump is removed through an cut (incision).

Most insurance plans cover the costs of diagnosing and treating fibroadenomas.

Treatment

Performed usually in outpatient settings, breast fibroadenomas are removed by lumpectomy, or surgical excision under local or general anesthesia. Sometimes lumps in younger women are not removed but are monitored by self-examination, yearly doctor check-ups, and mammograms. Surgery is generally recommended for women over 30, and for lumps that are painful or enlarging.

Alternative treatments

Alternative treatments for breast fibroadenomas include a low-fat, high-fiber, vegetarian-type diet; a reduction in caffeine intake; supplementation with evening primrose oil (Oenothera biennis), flax oil, or fish oil and vitamins E and C; and the application of hot compresses to the breast. In addition, a focus on liver cleansing is important to assist the body in conjugation and elimination of excess estrogens. Botanical remedies can be useful in hormone balancing, as can acupuncture and homeopathy. Massaging the breasts with castor oil, straight or infused with herbs or essential oils, can help fibroadenomas reduce and dissipate, as well as keep women in touch with changes in their breast tissue.

Prognosis

Breast fibroadenomas are not cancerous. The lumps recur in up to 20% of women. A small number of lumps disappear on their own.

Prevention

Breast fibroadenomas cannot be prevented. They can be discovered early by regular breast self-examination.

<TABLE borderColor=#ffffff cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" bgColor=lightgrey border=0><TBODY><TR><TD><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 bgColor=lightgrey><TBODY><TR><TD>Terms:</TD></TR><TR><TD>Aspiration </TD></TR><TR><TD>To withdraw material with a needle and syringe. </TD></TR><TR><TD>Biopsy </TD></TR><TR><TD>To remove cells or tissue for microscopic examination. </TD></TR><TR><TD>Estrogen </TD></TR><TR><TD>Female sex hormone produced by the ovaries.</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

<TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Resources:</TD></TR><TR><TD>BOOKS</TD></TR><TR><TD>Giuliano, Armando E. "Breast: Fibroadenoma of the Breast." In Current Medical Diagnosis and Treatment, edited by Lawrence M. Tierney, Jr., et al. Stamford, CT: Appleton & Lange, 1996. </TD></TR><TR><TD>Hacker, Neville F. "Breast Disease: A Gynecologic Perspective." In Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology, edited by Neville F. Hacker, et al. Philadelphia, PA: W.B. Saunders Company, 1992. </TD></TR><TR><TD>Loecher, Barbara, Sara Altshull O'Donnell, and the Editors of Prevention Magazine. "Breast Problems. Soothing Tactics for Pain, Tenderness, and Worry." In New Choices in Natural Healing for Women. Drug-Free Remedies From the World of Alternative Medicine. Emmaus, PA: Rodale Press, 1997. </TD></TR><TR><TD>Love, Susan M., and Karen Lindsay. "Lumps and Lumpiness." In Dr. Susan Love's Breast Book. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 1995. </TD></TR><TR><TD>Rosenthal, M. Sara. "Is It Cancer?" In The Breast Sourcebook: Everything You Need to Know About Breast Cancer Detection, Treatment, and Prevention. Los Angeles: Lowell House, 1996.</TD></TR><TR><TD>PERIODICALS</TD></TR><TR><TD>Deckers, Peter J., and Andrew Ricci, Jr. "Pain and Lumps in the Female Breast." Hospital Practice 28 (February 1992): 67-73, 77-78, 87-94.</TD></TR><TR><TD>Delaney, Lisa. "Breast Protection At Your Fingertips." Prevention Magazine (July 1994): 81-83, 86-87, 137. </TD></TR><TR><TD>Donegan, William L. "Evaluation of a Palpable Breast Mass." The New England Journal of Medicine 24 (September 1992): 937-942. </TD></TR><TR><TD>Dupont, William, D., David L. Page, and Fritz F. Parl. "Long-Term Risk of Breast Cancer in Women with Fibroadenoma." The New England Journal of Medicine 7 (July 1994): 10-15. </TD></TR><TR><TD>Glaser, Vicki. "Benign Breast Disorders." Patient Care 14 (April 1997): 140-151.</TD></TR><TR><TD>ORGANIZATIONS</TD></TR><TR><TD>American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. 409 12th Street, SW, Washington, DC 20024. (202) 638-5577. http://www.acog.org. </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><TABLE borderColor=#ffffff cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" bgColor=#ffffff border=0><TBODY><TR><TD><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" bgColor=#ffffff border=0><TBODY><TR align=middle><TD colSpan=3><TABLE width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD><HR></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><TABLE><TBODY><TR><TD><CENTER>

The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

This health encyclopedia is made possible by the Dr. Joseph F. Smith Trust Fund. Dr. Smith was a surgeon who resided in Wausau from 1908 to 1952. In addition to his surgical practice, Dr. Smith possessed a strong commitment to community service and medical education. The agreement which created the Dr. Joseph F. Smith Medical library was signed in July of 1948. </CENTER>

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Originally Posted by Kage_sCupotea I love that graphic! Thanks!

Actually, this is a random webpage I googled, but it's an actual reliable medical site. It contains the same basic information as the pamphlet that the radiologist gave me. I haven't yet spoken to my gyn Dr. because she's awaiting the results herself. I should hear from her by the start of next week, though. The radiologist was the basic truth, though. If there had been only the technician doing the ultrasound, then I wouldn't have known the diagnosis. However, since there was a radiologist right there, she was able to share the results as she was doing the ultrasound. It sure was nice being able to walk out of there knowing what exactly my lump is.

Yes!! Good. And it's not something that is going to keep you from doing anything. This is actually great news and I bet a HUGE relief for you.I'm relieved for you too. You've been through a lot in the past few years!



 
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Well, apparently it's not completely over. I've been meaning to share this for a few days, but kept forgetting. My gynecologist called last Friday and told me she'd gotten the results from both my ultrasounds. I do indeed have a few fibroid tumors in my pelvic area, but she said those shouldn't be a problem, even with childbirth. She talked with me about the fibroadenoma, but never actually called it that, even though the radiologist did. She asked if we have a general surgeon, and I said "no." She recommended one to me, and told me that I may want to meet with him, and see about getting it biopsied. From what I've been reading about these fibroadenomas, they're quite common, and even though they're benign tumors, sometimes they're biopsied. I don't quite understand the reasons behind this. I'd almost rather have it removed completely in the first place, than to have it biopsied and then removed. I understand that they can grow during pregnancy, so perhaps they're interested in removing it before I get pregnant. I did tell my doctor that our finances are quite tight because of all this medical stuff, and insurance hasn't helped much, so I'll probably wait on the general surgeon for now, especially since he's going to charge me just for talking with him anyway. All these minimal charges for everything sure add up! I just wish someone could give me a good reason why they consider biopsies on such common fibroadenomas, which are not a risk for breast cancer. Nowhere in all that I've read has there been a good explanation for that. Has anyone had a breast biopsy? I've heard they can hurt a bit. I'm sure that God will give me the grace if I must have one, but I'm quite nervous. I just hate the birth control pill Yasmin so very, very much, knowing it has been the cause of all of my health problems in the last year. How much money has been spent on medical attention - if only I'd never gotten on those stupid hormones. Anyway...sorry to go on and on...I'm just very irritated and confused and unsure.

 

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