Official Rosacea Thread

Makeuptalk.com - Makeup forums and reviews

Help Support Makeuptalk.com - Makeup forums and reviews:

Joined
Jun 13, 2004
Messages
430
Reaction score
1
I wanted to start this thread because I have Rosacea and so do other members here on MUT. I thought it would be nice to be able to talk about it here because it is such a comfortable place. So, we can share skin care and makeup ideas. Although, this is in no a way a medical web site,Tony & Reija were nice enough to allow this topic. Thanks you T&R!
So, I'm going start off by posting some information about what Rosacea is. Feel free to Jump in anytime.

What Is Rosacea?

Most people have very little knowledge of rosacea, treatment, symptoms or the cause. Knowing the symptoms and finding the treatment that works for you is the best defense against the social and psychological trauma.
The rosacea classic symptoms are patchy flushing (redness) and inflammation, particularly on the cheeks, nose, forehead, and around the mouth. Rosacea typically appears between the ages of 30 and 50 and affects more women than men. As symptoms emerge slowly, rosacea may initially be mistaken for sunburn, leading to a delay in proper rosacea treatment. Rosacea treatment delayed is 'rosacea treatment denied'.

Rosacea is a hereditary; chronic (long term) skin disorder that most often affects the nose, forehead, cheekbones, and chin (Dr. Berasques). Groups of tiny microvessels (arterioles, capillaries, and venules) close to the surface of the skin become dilated, resulting in blotchy red areas with small papules (a small, red solid elevated inflammatory skin lesion without pus) and pustules (pus-filled inflammatory bumps). The redness can come and go, but eventually it may become permanent. Furthermore, the skin tissue can swell and thicken and may be tender and sensitive to the touch. Pustules are 'not' pimples. Pimples have a bacterial component to their makeup and are also mainly localized in and around the hair follicles while papules are a raised solid red lesion without pus.

Although it may first appear as early as the teen years, rosacea symptoms most frequently begins when rosacea sufferers enter their 30s, 40s or 50s as a flushing or transient redness on the cheeks or nose, and in some cases the chin or forehead. In this earliest stage, some patients may report stinging or burning sensations, including the feeling of dry or tight skin.

"While the incidence of rosacea appears to be rising sharply as more people enter the most susceptible age, many mistakenly think it's just a complexion problem that will go away by itself -- it usually keeps growing worse if left unchecked," said Dr. Joseph Bikowski, assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the University of Pittsburgh. "Of greatest concern is that only a small percentage of rosacea sufferers realize that medical help is available from dermatologists to halt its progression and reverse its symptoms."

Rosacea may be persistent and worsen over time, leading to permanent changes in appearance and affecting self-esteem. The condition is treatable. Most cases can be controlled easily by avoiding factors that trigger flushing, using sun protection, and by keeping the body well hydrated with water.

As the condition progresses, flushing becomes more persistent and noticeable. Small, red, solid bumps (called papules) and pus-filled pimples (called pustules) may appear on the skin. Because these appear similar to acne, it is sometimes called acne rosacea or adult acne. However, unlike acne, there are no blackheads. Though rosacea is sometimes referred to as "adult acne," it is a distinctly different and often more serious condition than acne vulgaris, which most commonly occurs during adolescence. While both conditions can cause pimples, rosacea requires different therapy -- acne treatments can actually make it worse -- and rosacea rarely goes away by itself.

Small, dilated blood vessels may become visible, too. Often when people with rosacea blush, the enlarged blood vessels in their faces can look like thin red lines.

In advanced cases, more of the face is affected. The skin swells, cysts form, and small, knobby bumps develop on the nose, making it appear red and swollen. This condition, called rhinophyma, is relatively uncommon and primarily affects men. It was the cause of the late comedian W.C. Fields' best-known feature -- his trademark bulbous nose.

Ocular Rosacea: It can also cause a persistent burning and feeling of grittiness in the eyes or inflamed and swollen eyelids with small inflamed bumps. The eyes may become bloodshot and eyelashes sometimes fall out (Dr. Thiboutot). The rosacea ophthalmic signs are exceedingly variable, including blepharitis, conjunctivitis, iritis, iridocyclitis, hypopyoniritis, and even keratitis. The rosacea ophthalmic complications are independent of the severity of facial rosacea. Rosacea keratitis has an unfavorable prognosis, and in extreme cases can lead to corneal opacity with blindness. The most frequent signs of ocular rosacea, which may never progress, are chronically inflamed margins of the eyelids with scales and crusts, quite similar to seborrheic dermatitis, with which it is often confused. Pain and photophobia may be present. It is instructive to ask rosacea patients how their eyes react to bright sunlight.

Stages - Plewig and Kligman Classification of Rosacea

(Taken from their book, Acne and Rosacea, Second Edition, 1993)

Stage I: The erythema (redness) may persist for hours and days, hence the old term erthema congestivum (redness congestion). Erythema lasting only a few minutes is not early rosacea. Telangiectases becomes progressively prominent, forming sprays on the nose, nasolabial folds, checks, and glabella. Most of these patients complain of sensitive skin that stings, burns, and itches after application of a variety of cosmetics, especially certain fragrances and sunscreens. Trauma from abrasives and peeling agents readily induces long-lasting erythema, thus the facial skin is unusually vulnerable to chemical and physical stimuli.
Stage II: Inflammatory papules and pustules crop up and persist for weeks. Some papules show a small pustule at the apex, justifying the term papulopustular. The lesions are always follicular in origin, mainly in sebaceous follicles but also in the smaller and more numerous vellus follicles. Comedones do not occur. The deeper inflammatory lesions may heal with scarring, but scars are inconspicuous and tend to be shallow. Facial pores become larger and prominent. If there has been much solar exposure over decades, the stigmata of photodamaged skin becomes superimposed, namely yellowed, leathered skin (elastosis), wrinkles and solar comedones. The papulopustular attacks become more and more frequent. Finally, rosacea may extend over the entire face and even spread to the scalp, especially if the patient is balding. Itchy follicular pustules of the scalp are typical. Eventually, the sides of the neck as well as the retroauricular and presternal area may be affected.

Stage III: A small proportion of patients develop more serious expressions of the disease, namely large inflammatory nodules, furunculoid infiltrations, and tissue hyperplasia. These derangements occur particularly on the cheeks and nose, less often on the chin, forehead, or ears. The facial contours gradually become coarse, thickened, and irregular. Curiously, patients may not notice these disfigurements. The deranged appearance becomes evident when photographs from previous years are reviewed. Finally, the patient shows diffusely inflamed, thickened, edematous skin with large pores, resembling the peel of an orange. These coarse features are due to extensively inflammatory infiltration, connective tissue hypertrophy, massive fibrosis and elastosis, diffuse sebaceous gland hyperplasia, and extreme enlargement of individual sebaceous glands forming dozens of yellowish unbilicated papules on the cheeks, forehead, temples, and nose. Thickened folds and ridges may create a grotesque appearance mimicking leonine facies of leprosy or leukemia. The ultimate deformity is the phymas, of which rhinophyma is the prototype.

What Causes Rosacea?

No one knows for certain what causes rosacea. Researchers have suggested several factors that may be related to its development:

  • A disorder of the blood vessels that causes them to swell, leading to flushing.
  • A genetic predisposition combined with certain environmental factors that may irritate the skin.
Rosacea seems to affect fair-skinned people more often, though it can affect any skin type. Often several people in a family have the condition, thus it is believed to be at least partly genetic. The disorder may be somewhat more common in women, but is often more severe in men. In some cases, it may be associated with migraine headache, other skin disorders, and certain eye disorders, including blepharitis and keretitis.
Any one of the following warning signs can be a signal to see a rosacea expert for diagnosis and appropriate treatment before the signs and symptoms become increasingly severe:

  • Redness on the cheeks, nose, chin or forehead.
  • Small visible blood vessels on the face.
  • Bumps or pimples on the face.
  • Watery or irritated eyes.
Rosacea is aggravated by many factors, including sunlight, physical and mental stress, sinus and allergy conditions, hot liquids, spicy foods, extremes in temperature, alcohol (either topically applied or orally consumed) and stress (Drs. McKoewn, Wilkin, Wilkin, Wilkin). But it is important to note that what aggravates one person's rosacea may have no effect on another person's condition (Dr. Wilkin)
The following other conditions can have symptoms similar to rosacea:

Acne is the term for plugged pores (blackheads and whiteheads), pimples, and even deeper lumps (cysts or nodules) that occur on the face, neck, chest, back, shoulders and even the upper arms. Acne affects most teenagers to some extent, but can also affect adults in their 20s, 30s and 40s. While there is no permanent cure for acne, it is controllable.

Psoriasis causes the skin to become inflamed, while producing red, thickened areas with silvery scales. This persistent skin disease occurs most often on the scalp, elbows, knees, and lower back. In some cases, psoriasis is so mild that people don't know they have it. At the opposite extreme, severe psoriasis may cover large areas of the body.

Eczema is used to describe all kinds of red, blistering, oozing, scaly, brownish, thickened, and itching skin conditions.

The word atopic describes a group of allergic or associated diseases that often affect several members of a family. These families may have allergies such as hay fever and asthma, but also have skin eruptions called Atopic Dermatitis. The disease can occur at any age, but is most common in infants to young adults.

Eczema/Atopic Dermatitis in infants occurs mainly on the face and scalp, although spots can appear elsewhere. In teens and young adults, the eruptions typically occur on the elbow bends and backs of the knees, ankles and wrists and on the face, neck and upper chest.

 
Joined
Jun 13, 2004
Messages
430
Reaction score
1
Acne or Rosacea?

Rosacea has been called 'adult acne' often. Sometimes rosacea is called 'acne rosacea.' However, technically acne is distinct from rosacea. While you may have acne and rosacea at the same time there is a distinct difference between the two. Acne is technically a condition while rosacea is a disease. Acne vulgaris is a disease different from rosacea. The International Rosacea Foundation has this to say about the subject:

"...Note: Pustules are NOT pimples. Pimples have a bacterial component to their makeup and are also mainly localized in and around the hair follicles....

...As the condition [rosacea] progresses, flushing becomes more persistent and noticeable. Small, red, solid bumps (called papules) and pus-filled pimples (called pustules) may appear on the skin. Because these appear similar to acne, rosacea is sometimes called acne rosacea or adult acne. However, unlike acne, there are no blackheads. Though rosacea is sometimes referred to as "adult acne," it is a distinctly different and often more serious condition than acne vulgaris, which most commonly occurs during adolescence. While both conditions can cause pimples, rosacea requires different therapy -- acne treatments can actually make it worse -- and rosacea rarely goes away by itself....

...The following other conditions can have symptoms similar to rosacea:

According to the American Academy of Dermatology, Acne is the term for plugged pores (blackheads and whiteheads), pimples, and even deeper lumps (cysts or nodules) that occur on the face, neck, chest, back, shoulders and even the upper arms. Acne affects most teenagers to some extent, but can also affect adults in their 20s, 30s and 40s. While there is no permanent cure for acne, it is controllable...." source >

http://internationalrosaceafoundation.org/

 
Joined
Jun 13, 2004
Messages
430
Reaction score
1
<TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=392 border=0><TBODY><TR><TD class=beautytitle colSpan=2>Getting the Red Out </TD></TR><TR><TD colSpan=2>
</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top rowSpan=2></TD><TD class=bodytext vAlign=top>Finacea, a new rosacea treatment, has proven effective in reducing redness

by Annie Stuart

</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=bottom></TD></TR><TR><TD colSpan=2>
</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=600 border=0><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top width=600><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=600 border=0><TBODY><TR><TD class=bodytext>Rosacea plagues 14 million Americans with facial redness, bumps, pimples, and visible blood vessels, yet its cause and cure remain elusive. But for now, there's help for the symptoms.

In a trial of 251 rosacea sufferers, azelaic acid gel (Finacea) was the surprising upstart, outlasting the effectiveness of the current top treatment, metronidazole gel (MetroGel). Finacea continued to improve symptoms throughout the 15-week trial, while MetroGel plateaued after just 8 weeks, says researcher Boni Elewski, MD, of the University of Alabama. "It even reduced redness, a difficult symptom."

And the treatment caused no major side effects, and most of the patients who experienced a temporary stinging sensation from the gel found it easy to tolerate.

</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR><TR><TD colSpan=3>
</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

 
Joined
Jun 13, 2004
Messages
430
Reaction score
1
Hi Moll, I'm sorry I didn't respond to your post sooner but I didn't see it.

Yes it is. I'm hoping that more people will feel comfortable enough to come and chat with us. I'm using the Rosacea kit from Botanicalworks.com right now and I really like it. It has all natural ingredients, it's very gentle and my skin likes it.

But I still want to try the La Roche-Posay Toleraine Line because I've heard so many good things about it from the support group at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/rosacea-support. Plus, Dr. Nase recommends it in his book Beating Rosacea: Vascular, Ocular and Acne Forms at http://www.drnase.com/. I've learned a lot from the group and Dr. Nase's book. Have you read it?

Toleraine isn't very expensive and many people have been able to tolerate it and have seen improvements. So, of course I have to try it. lol


Originally Posted by mollmarie It's nice to have a thread dedicated to this trying skin condtion! I would love to know products others have use to help keep there rosacea in check.I have tried the Jan Marini line for cleansing and such so far. The papaya mask seems to work wonders on evening out my skin tone.

Any other tried and true products out there?

Moll

 
Joined
Jun 13, 2004
Messages
430
Reaction score
1
Hi Moll, I've used Cetaphil and it did calm things down but did nothing for p&p's. But my Dermo gave me topical Clindamycin for them and it works great. My skin is more on the dry side right now too. Yes I'm using I'm using Illuminaire mineral liquid/cream foundation at http://www.illuminarecosmetics.com/. You could also check out Coverblend and Dermablend. I'd to try Dr. H's because of the natural ingredients but I seem to sensitive to them lately. Dr. Nase has asked Paula Begoun (Author of The Beauty Bible and Don't Go To The Cosmetic Counter without Me @ http://cosmetcicop.com/ ) to develop a skin care line specifically for Rosacea and she is working on it now. She has her own skin care and makeup lines as well. So, it should be interesting to see what she comes up with. You'll see them talking about it in that group.


TTYL

~Diane

Originally Posted by mollmarie I have not heard of the La Roche-Posay Toleraine Line, so please keep me updated. I had been 6 weeks into using the Jan Marini line and wham! a flare-up. My doc told me to try cetaphil cleansing lotion and moisturizer. In 3-4 days, my skin looked great. I am sticking with this routine for a while. No redness, bumps or anything! I would have never have thought something I could buy at my local walmart could be so effective. I also heard B. Kamins has a line especially for rosacea also. I am going to try that or Dr. Hauschka's cleansing milk in the future. I hear both are good products for sensitive skin. I seem to be heading to the drier side as of late, which is my doc said stay away from gels and use lotion or milk based products. Do you use a foundations? I am looking for a new one since my powder is to dry for me now.

I am going to check at the group at yahoo. Sounds like you get some good info. there.

Thanks for the heads up!

Moll

 
Joined
Jun 13, 2004
Messages
430
Reaction score
1
Hi Genie,

Welcome to Makeuptalk!
I understand how you feel because I was in denial too. I kept saying, Oh, I must allergic to this product or that product until I started feeling the flushing. It felt like my face was on fire and my face looked like I got a bad sunburn. Then when to the doctor and when she said Rosacea I looked at her like yeah right! lol But I have since learned that it's not so bad and it is treatable. The early you treat it the better the outcome. Here's a few links to help you learn a little more about it and what you can do. If you have any questions or just want to chat PM me or post here..K

http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/rosacea-support/

http://www.rosaceaguide.ca/

http://www.drnase.com/

http://my.webmd.com/hw/health_guide_atoz/zp3400.asp?navbar=tr5971

Have a good day!

~Diane

Originally Posted by Genie100 Well,I think I may have early signs of Rosacea. My cheeks get very red and hot to the touch periodically during the day. I can conceal it with a light foundation, but if it is Rosacea I suppose I should see a dermatologist and get some professional advice.

I have been living in denial about this. I take a medication for Leukemia daily and it does a number on sommany of my systems that I blamed the flushing on the meds. After reading all the info I can find on Rosacea, I am starting to think I may have it.

I guess I will have to get me to yet another doctor!

Thanks for all the great info!

 
Joined
Jun 13, 2004
Messages
430
Reaction score
1
Hi Genie, how did it go at the doctors today? Rosacea Care is a highly recommended skin care line for Rosacea. I know several people who are using is and are seeing good results. Their stronium <sp?> lotion is suppose to be really good. I haven't tried it so let me know how it works for you..K

Talk to you soon.

Diane

 
Joined
Jun 13, 2004
Messages
430
Reaction score
1
Hi Genie,

I had that test too. I think it is standard just to make sure. Don't use the Cortaid! If you do have Rosacea it will make it worse. You can't use any kind of steroids on your face. You can use Eldel <sp> instead. The zinc in the minerals is calming on Rosacea skin. I'm glad the bare minerals is working well for you. I used to use it but it was too drying on my skin. So, now I'm using Corys minerals because she has a mineral cream foundation stick and I love it! Your Dermo will be able to give you more help than your primary dr.

Oh yeah, please keep me posted.

Best wishes

Diane

Originally Posted by Genie100 Hi Diane,Something that has helped.....I received my order of Bare Minerals SPF 15 foundation! I love it! It actually seemed to calm my skin as well as providing nice light coverage for the redness. I am very happy so far with that.

So...now I wait until My 17th to see the deramtologist and hopefully he can get the red out!!!


Will keep you posted!

Thanks,

Genie

 
Joined
Jun 13, 2004
Messages
430
Reaction score
1
Hi Genie,

I'm glad the Rosacea care products and the mineral makeup are working for you. When you get a chance will you please do a review on them? It may be helpful to others. I've been so busy lately that I haven't had a chance yet to do my reviews of the products I've tried so far. I'm going try Pure Luxe mineral makeup and see if it works better for me. Let me know what the Dermo says.

Good Luck,

Diane

 
Joined
Jun 13, 2004
Messages
430
Reaction score
1
Hi Genie,

That would be great.
My face has been very irritated lately and I think it's because of the light winds we have had here. The Biotherm products that tried didn't work out. They actually made me break out.
The calming lotion sounds promising. I hope it continues to work well for you. Oh, that is funny about Pure Lux. They actually have support forum here http://forums.delphiforums.com/pureluxe and there is a Mineral makeup forum where they talk about A LOT of mineral makeup products, companies, tips etc, here (including BE); http://forums.delphiforums.com/mineralmakeup/start

Let me know what you think of the corrector. I'm curious about it because I haven't tried a mineral corrector or Pure Luxe minerals yet. LOL Scarlett red!

Please keep me posted and I'll do the same.


Have a good day.

~Diane

Originally Posted by Genie100 Hi Diane,
I will definitely write up some reviews once I have been using the products a bit longer.

I have had a couple of flushing episodes, but it seems I put the calming lotion on and it settles down very quickly. I am going to wait before ordering full sizes of the lotion and the gel until after I see the dermatologist and see what he says.

Funny you should mention pure luxe. I stumbled on their website a few days ago. I actually ordered a small size of their "what red?" color corrector. We'll see how that goes. I am still pleased with the BE foundation. Even with a flushing episode it covers pretty well for me. I look a little pink but not scarlett red! LOL

Anyway...will let you know what the derma says!

Thanks again for all your help,

Genie

 
Joined
Jun 13, 2004
Messages
430
Reaction score
1
Skin care and beauty tips combat effects of rosacea

Adapted from the National Rosacea Society by HealthGate Editorial Staff

In a society where "beauty is as beauty does," the ravages of rosacea can be devastating. With its conspicuous effects on the most visible part of the body-the face- rosacea can impact social interactions, success, and self-image. Fortunately, many patients are able to effectively control the symptoms of rosacea through long-term medical therapy and lifestyle modifications. Other important measures are effective skin care and makeup.

Avoid common skin-care products that irritate

The first step for rosacea sufferers is to use special caution in selecting skin-care products to avoid ingredients that may cause irritation. In a survey of 1,023 rosacea patients conducted by the National Rosacea Society, nearly 82% reported their condition was sensitive or somewhat sensitive to common skin-care products.

Women's skin-care products

Of the women who responded, more than 49% reported that astringents and toners lead the list of products that have irritated their rosacea, followed by soap products (40%), exfoliating agents (34%), makeup (29%), perfume/cologne (27%), moisturizer (25.5%) and hairspray (20%).

Men's skin-care products

Among the men who responded, rosacea flare-ups had been caused by shaving lotion (24%), soap (24%), perfume/cologne (19%), and sunscreen (13%). Over 12% of both men and women said flare-ups had been caused by shampoo.

Alcohol topped the list as the most irritating ingredient noted in the survey, cited by 66 percent of all respondents. Other ingredients reported to burn, sting, or aggravate the skin of those surveyed included witch hazel (30%), fragrance (29.5%), menthol (21%), peppermint (14%), and eucalyptus oil (13%).

In addition to identifying and avoiding irritating ingredients, rosacea patients are generally advised to use skin-care products that are water-soluble and nonabrasive.

Gentle skin care

Here are some tips to make the most of your skin-care routine:

  • Proper skin care begins with a thorough and gentle cleansing, avoiding skin-care products that may sting, burn or cause redness.
  • Never pull, tug, scratch or use loofahs, brushes or harsh sponges.
  • Use only a small amount of cleanser to wash your face. Run your index finger across the soap, or put a small drop of cleanser in the palm of your hand. Then gently work the soap or cleanser across your face with your fingertips. If you prefer, a soft shaving brush can be used to lather the face.
  • Rinse several times with lukewarm water and blot dry with a thick pile towel. Never rub your face briskly or use extremely hot water since hot water and high temperatures can make facial irritation worse.
  • Let your face rest for a few minutes. If using a topical medication, apply it first before using moisturizer or makeup. Allow the medication to dry approximately five to 10 minutes. Before applying any other skin-care product including moisturizer or makeup, check with your doctor to make sure it is compatible with your medication.
  • Apply a water-based moisturizer first when using sunscreens or cosmetics, and allow it to dry. Then apply the sunscreen and allow it to dry before using a cosmetic foundation or base. Sunscreens with an SPF of 15 or higher are recommended, and pediatric sunscreens may be preferable for patients with sensitive skin.
  • Use an electric shaver rather than a blade to avoid irritating facial skin. If you must use a blade, never use a dull one that requires extra scraping for a clean shave. Avoid shaving creams, gels, aftershaves that sting or irritate.
  • Wash again in the evening and air dry before applying medication.
  • Green and yellow makeup can be used to cover the red tones of rosacea. Green-tinted prefoundations are available in liquids or creams at most cosmetic counters.
  • Follow makeup with skin-tone foundation that offers moderate to heavy coverage, depending on the thickness of the formulation. However, avoid powders, which can make dry, flaky skin look worse.
For best results, rosacea sufferers should be diligent with their skin-care techniques and medical therapy, and avoid anything that triggers a flare-up-a more intense outbreak of bumps and pimples.



SOURCE:

National Rosacea Society, July 2000

<HR style="COLOR: #ccc" noShade SIZE=1>

 
Joined
Jun 13, 2004
Messages
430
Reaction score
1
Hi little00blondie, Welcome to Makeuptalk!


Yes it is, we are thankful to makeuptalks administrators for letting us have the thread. I'm glad to hear the the Retina-A is working well for you. I tried the Eucerin redness relief products and my skin didn't like them. I didn't use the Eucerin pen, what does it do? I'll post some more tips.

Have a good day!

~Diane

Originally Posted by little00blondie Hey you guys- how nice to have a thread dedicate to this! I have something similiar to rosacea- which basically has the same rosy effect. I've never had anyone to talk to about it before! It's one of those things where you're silently so embaressed, but no one else really cares.I actually was on Finacae for a year, but it didn't 100% work to the degree I wanted. My derma just recently put me on Retin-A (oddly enough), and so far that has worked wonders. I'm supposed to put it on at night, but I do it in the daytime instead (and ALWAYS wear SPF.) I really love it so far. Also, I use the Eucerin daytime redness relief moisturizer, and then apply my choice of tinted moisturizer or foundation, and then cover up any remaining redness with the Eucerin redness relief pen.

Let me know if y'all have any other tips!

 
Joined
Jun 13, 2004
Messages
430
Reaction score
1
That's really cool. I've seen the green corrective makeup in cream form but I haven't tried yet. I keep thinking it would show through my foundation but I'll give this one a try and see what it looks like. Your welcome!


Originally Posted by little00blondie Well, the pen just distributes a little drop of green-colored cream, and you dot it on red spots like you would use a highlighter. I like mine the best (after trying different ways) when I apply it after moisturizer and little bronzer. I dot it on the red spots, and then apply a tinted moisturizer or foundation over. I guess it would work different on every person though : )Thanks so much for posting such great stuff!

 
Joined
Apr 7, 2005
Messages
32
Reaction score
0
Ladies,

Do you know of any websites with photos at different stages. My skin has been red for the last few years. I am now 37. I don't have bumps or patches though. It is more the overall redness that annoys me. My neck is ghost white in contrast to me face. I know a derm should be able to tell me, but I am hoping I can see some examples to get a better idea of whether that is necessary.

Thanks,

Holly

 
Joined
Oct 22, 2003
Messages
22,667
Reaction score
442
Location
Huntington Beach, CA
Originally Posted by heart-shaped

virgin coconut oil can actually tamed roscea. i tried this and it actually eases red bumps. it really works.


Welcome to MakeupTalk! Happy to have you!
 
Joined
Oct 22, 2003
Messages
22,667
Reaction score
442
Location
Huntington Beach, CA
Originally Posted by simplysleepless

Hi, My name is Lisa, and I'm new to Makeup Talk. I was so happy to see this thread. I am 37 and have suffered from rosacea for about 7 years. I tried the usual meds like Metrogel/cream and minocycline with marginal results (the minocycline would clear up the "acne" component well). Benzamycin (sp?) applied topically worked well once I couldn't take oral antibiotics due to pregnancy and nursing.
I got tired of paying $75 a bottle for the Benzmycin, which only lasts 30 days before it gets all gummy. Anyway, I recently tried gentle at-home glycolic peels and that worked for me to clear up the break outs (L'Oreal Renoviste). This was an unexpected side effect of an attempt to deal with my skin's intolerance for most exfoliants!

I feel like I'm fighting two battles at this stage--redness/acne from rosacea as well as the usual aging issues (sun damage, fine lines, etc). It's hard when so many anti-aging products and treatments are off-limits with rosacea! I'd love to hear what has worked for those of you with the same issue.

Has anyone tried IPL (intense pulsed light)? I just had my first treatment.

Also, I have a question about virgin coconut oil. May be a stupid one---but do you mean to apply it topically or take it orally?

Thanks! I'm very glad to have found this thread!

Lisa




Welcome to MakeupTalk!
 
Joined
Apr 25, 2005
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Does anyone know of a topical product that diminishes dilated blood vessels on the nose caused by rosacea?

 
Joined
Jul 28, 2005
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Hi,

I went to the doctor thinking I had rosacea. So he gave me some antibiotics and sent me on my way. I reacted to both the generic and the real brand stuff so I just let it go. It looks like maybe he should/could have run a test or two. This makes me so mad. Right now I'm using Oil of Olay and it seems to be helping but I have to do it night and day other wise my skin looks horrible. Not only do I have a redness problem. I also have a acne problem. I thought I would be done with this at 23, but I'm not. I'm going to try a different doctor. I'll insist on some topical stuff this time. Thanks for this forum and all the helpful infor on here. I wish a doctor would just tell me what my problem is whether its really rosacea or not, but i think it is. My face has been red for many years and it gets worse at certain times of the day.

Rachel

 
Joined
Aug 9, 2004
Messages
56
Reaction score
0
Originally Posted by Holly Ladies,
Do you know of any websites with photos at different stages.

Thanks,

Holly

Holly, I hope this catches your attention. Charmaine just posted a link on page 2 that should help. Here it is again. It does have pics.
 
Joined
Oct 18, 2005
Messages
9
Reaction score
0
hi all,

that was some great information on rosacea and its difference from acne..

My doctor was saying that clearskin acne treatment works well both for acne as well as rosacea.. Is it true ? has anybody got any success story to share regarding this medication.

 

Latest posts

Top