Fragrance Breakdowns

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I came across this info and thought I'd pass it along.

A perfume creator composes a story around a central theme just as a writer would. That theme constitutes the main accord of the composition and will determine the family of the perfume, whereas, the secondary accords will indicate its subfamily. There are eight major families : Floral, Chypre, Oriental (masculine and feminine), Woody, Aromatic and Hesperide (masculine and feminine). Each one of those olfactive families being itself split into several subfamilies.

Chypre

Based on a woody, mossy, floral accord, which can include leathery or fruity notes as well, chypre perfumes have a rich and lingering scent.

Chypre by Coty enjoyed such success in 1917 that "chypre" is now a generic name for a whole category of timeless, classic perfumes. The compositions are based on oak moss, ciste-labdanum, patchouli and bergamot accords. The richness of chypre notes mixes wonderfully with fruity or floral notes. This family is made up of distinguished, instantly recognizable fragrances.

Citrus

Citrus oils, known to perfumers as "Hesperidia", are the key elements in this family that includes all "eaux fraîches".

Each perfume in this family is primarily composed of citrus scents such as bergamot, lemon, orange, tangerine and grapefruit, to which other orange-tree elements (orange blossoms, petit grain or neroli oil) have been added. Floral or even chypre accords are sometimes present as well. These perfumes are characterized by their freshness and lightness including the first "Eaux de Cologne".

Floral

The large floral family includes all fragrances with a flower or bouquet as their main theme.

This family is composed of a large variety of creations ranging from sumptuous bouquet arrangements to "soli flora" compositions. Perfumers can let their creativity run wild, enriching florals with green, aldehydic, fruity or spicy hints. With its natural scent, the floral note is one of the most widely used in women's perfumes.

Oriental

Where warmth meets sensuality. Musk, vanilla and precious woods with a touch of tropical flowers and spice.

Orientals -- also known as 'amber' fragrances - stand out because of their unique blend of warmth and sensuality. They draw their richness from heady substances like musk, vanilla and precious woods, often associated with exotic floral and spicy scents.

If you want to read about fragrances here are some suggestions:

Essence and Alchemy: A Book of Perfume

Mandy Aftel

Perfume Legends

Michael Edwards

Perfume: The Art and Science of Scent

Cathy Newman, Robb Kendrick (Photographies)

The Scents of Time: Perfume from Ancient Egypt to the 21st Century

Edwin T. Morris, éditions Minerva

 
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Great minds think alike TD..I was just going to post something similar.I recommend anything by Michael Edwards..He knows absolutely everything about fragrance

Originally Posted by Tinydancer I came across this info and thought I'd pass it along.
A perfume creator composes a story around a central theme just as a writer would. That theme constitutes the main accord of the composition and will determine the family of the perfume, whereas, the secondary accords will indicate its subfamily. There are eight major families : Floral, Chypre, Oriental (masculine and feminine), Woody, Aromatic and Hesperide (masculine and feminine). Each one of those olfactive families being itself split into several subfamilies.

Chypre

Based on a woody, mossy, floral accord, which can include leathery or fruity notes as well, chypre perfumes have a rich and lingering scent.

Chypre by Coty enjoyed such success in 1917 that "chypre" is now a generic name for a whole category of timeless, classic perfumes. The compositions are based on oak moss, ciste-labdanum, patchouli and bergamot accords. The richness of chypre notes mixes wonderfully with fruity or floral notes. This family is made up of distinguished, instantly recognizable fragrances.

Citrus

Citrus oils, known to perfumers as "Hesperidia", are the key elements in this family that includes all "eaux fraîches".

Each perfume in this family is primarily composed of citrus scents such as bergamot, lemon, orange, tangerine and grapefruit, to which other orange-tree elements (orange blossoms, petit grain or neroli oil) have been added. Floral or even chypre accords are sometimes present as well. These perfumes are characterized by their freshness and lightness including the first "Eaux de Cologne".

Floral

The large floral family includes all fragrances with a flower or bouquet as their main theme.

This family is composed of a large variety of creations ranging from sumptuous bouquet arrangements to "soli flora" compositions. Perfumers can let their creativity run wild, enriching florals with green, aldehydic, fruity or spicy hints. With its natural scent, the floral note is one of the most widely used in women's perfumes.

Oriental

Where warmth meets sensuality. Musk, vanilla and precious woods with a touch of tropical flowers and spice.

Orientals -- also known as 'amber' fragrances - stand out because of their unique blend of warmth and sensuality. They draw their richness from heady substances like musk, vanilla and precious woods, often associated with exotic floral and spicy scents.

If you want to read about fragrances here are some suggestions:

Essence and Alchemy: A Book of Perfume

Mandy Aftel

Perfume Legends

Michael Edwards

Perfume: The Art and Science of Scent

Cathy Newman, Robb Kendrick (Photographies)

The Scents of Time: Perfume from Ancient Egypt to the 21st Century

Edwin T. Morris, éditions Minerva

 

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