Garlic lovers unite!

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Garlic

Whether roasted, baked, sautéed, or raw, garlic always excels

There are many ways to prepare this redolent bulb, each method resulting in a somewhat different flavor. True garlic aficionados can be divided into two camps: those who believe in using garlic presses, and those who claim pressing makes the oil bitter. But however you choose to prepare it, know this: The more you cook garlic, the less pungent it becomes. It's only when eaten raw that garlic gives you that burning sensation.

How healthy is garlic? Researchers still can't seem to agree on just how much garlic is a good thing. Or which form is best. Here's where the debate stands.

Heart disease: About the equivalent of a clove of garlic per day may be all that's needed to lower blood-cholesterol levels an average of 9 percent, according to a New York Medical College report. Most of the credit goes to allicin, which is released when garlic is crushed or chewed. Several other chemicals believed to help keep blood vessels more flexible and block artery-clogging plaque are also found in garlic, as is ajoene, a potent anticlotting agent. Caveat to all garlic-supplement-takers: A recent study concludes this form of garlic ingestion is not an effective cholesterol-buster.

Cancer: No clinical trials have tested garlic's cancer-fighting potential. But reports suggest a correlation between high quantities of garlic in the local diets of several countries to low occurrences of certain kinds of cancer.

Choose well: Always select large heads of garlic; peeling those tiny cloves isn't worth the effort. Professionals call these small cloves "seed garlic," and indeed, they can be sprouted and planted if you like purple spheres of flowerlets.

A good head of garlic should be very hard; soft ones can be rotten or contain moldy spots, which spread very quickly through the cloves. The "paper" on a garlic head can be white or shot through with blue veins. This doesn't affect the taste, although in some places, blue garlic is cheaper.

Peeling garlic: A "head" of garlic is typically made up of 10 to 12 individual cloves. To peel a garlic clove, place a heavy-duty or chef's knife on top of the clove. Hit the flat side of the knife with the palm of your hand; this will slightly smash the clove, separating the peel from the garlic. Then the peel should easily slip away from the clove.

Roasting garlic: Roasting garlic in the oven mellows it into a slightly sweet, nutty spread that has the consistency of butter. Spread it on French bread for an appetizer or add it to dips, spreads, mashed potatoes, sauces, and soups. To roast garlic, remove the white papery skin from the garlic head (do not peel or separate cloves). Wrap each head separately in aluminum foil. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes to 1 hour; let cool 10 minutes. Then separate the cloves, and squeeze to extract pulp.

Browning garlic: This brings out its earthy nuttiness and is a way to jazz up plain vegetables. When preparing garlic, however, be careful because it burns quickly. To brown garlic, heat 1-1/2 teaspoons oil in a nonstick skillet. Add 4 large chopped garlic cloves; saute 3 minutes or until browned and toss with most any vegetable. Browned garlic is particularly good with potatoes, asparagus, artichokes, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts.

Stopping the sprouts: Garlic starts to go bad when it sprouts, turning the taste bitter. Once it's in your house, it'll start sprouting if it hasn't already. To delay this process, store garlic in a dark, cool, dry place if you've bought more than you'll use in a week. Those big braids of garlic heads you sometimes find make lovely decorations, but it's rare to make your way to the end of one before it goes bad.

 
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2 whole garlic heads

1 pound sweet turkey Italian sausage

1 teaspoon chopped fresh or 1/4 teaspoon dried sage

1 teaspoon chopped fresh or 1/4 teaspoon dried rosemary

2 tablespoons butter or stick margarine

1/3 cup all-purpose flour

6 cups 1% low-fat milk

1 cup (4 ounces) grated fresh Parmesan cheese

2/3 cup (about 2 1/2 ounces) shredded Gruyère or Swiss cheese

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon black pepper

8 cups hot cooked penne (about 1 pound uncooked tube-shaped pasta) or rigatoni

Cooking spray

Preheat oven to 350°.

Remove white papery skin from garlic heads (do not peel or separate the cloves). Wrap each head separately in foil. Bake at 350° for 1 hour; cool 10 minutes. Separate cloves; squeeze to extract garlic pulp. Discard skins. Set garlic aside.

Increase oven temperature to 400°.

Remove casings from sausage. Cook sausage in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat until browned, stirring to crumble. Remove from pan with a slotted spoon. Place sausage in a large bowl; stir in sage and rosemary. Melt butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Lightly spoon flour into a dry measuring cup; level with a knife. Add the flour to melted butter, stirring with a whisk. Gradually add the milk; cook until slightly thick, stirring constantly with a whisk (about 10 minutes). Stir in roasted garlic, cheeses, salt, and pepper. Remove mixture from heat. Add 5 1/2 cups cheese sauce and cooked pasta to sausage, stirring to coat. Spoon pasta mixture in a 13 x 9-inch baking dish coated with cooking spray. Top with remaining sauce. Bake at 400° for 15 minutes or until thoroughly heated.

Yield: 10 servings

 
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Herb-Garlic Chicken <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0 xmlns:fo="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Format"><TBODY><TR><TD>
</TD></TR><TR><TD colSpan=2>From Cooking Light</TD></TR><TR><TD>
</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>


This simplified version of the classic roast chicken with 40 cloves of garlic uses chicken breasts and cooks on top of the stove in less than half the time of the original.



6 (6-ounce) skinned chicken breast halves

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

2 teaspoons vegetable oil, divided

40 garlic cloves, peeled (about 5 whole garlic heads)

1 cup dry white wine or fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth

1 cup fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth

1/2 teaspoon dried herbes de Provence or thyme

Sprinkle chicken with salt and pepper. Heat 1 teaspoon oil in a Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add half of chicken; cook 3 minutes on each side or until browned. Remove from pan. Repeat procedure with 1 teaspoon oil and remaining chicken. Add garlic to pan; cook 4 minutes or until lightly browned, stirring frequently. Add wine, broth, and herbes de Provence, scraping pan to loosen browned bits. Return chicken to pan; cover, reduce heat, and simmer 30 minutes or until chicken is tender.

Yield: 6 servings (serving size: 1 chicken breast half and 1/3 cup sauce)

 
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Thickened by mashed potatoes, this rich soup gets its hearty, smoky flavor from the addition of bacon and garlic.



5 whole garlic heads

2 bacon slices, diced

1 cup diced onion

1 cup diced carrot

2 garlic cloves, minced

6 cups diced baking potato (about 2 pounds)

4 cups low-salt chicken broth

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon pepper

1 bay leaf

1 cup 2% low-fat milk

1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley

Remove white papery skin from each garlic head (do not peel or separate cloves). Wrap each head separately in aluminum foil. Bake at 350° for 1 hour; let cool for 10 minutes. Separate cloves, and squeeze to extract 1/4 cup of garlic pulp; discard the skins.

Cook bacon in a large saucepan over medium-high heat until crisp. Add onion, carrot, and minced garlic, and sauté 5 minutes. Add potato, broth, salt, pepper, and bay leaf; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 20 minutes or until potato is tender; remove bay leaf. Combine garlic pulp and 2 cups potato mixture in a blender or food processor, and process until smooth. Return purée to pan; stir in milk, and cook over low heat until thoroughly heated. Remove from heat, and stir in chopped parsley.

Yield: 7 servings (serving size: 1 cup)

 
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3 pounds medium-size red potatoes, quartered

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

1 tablespoon stone-ground mustard

2 teaspoons coriander seeds, crushed

6 garlic cloves, halved

1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley

1/2 cup plain low-fat yogurt

1/3 cup thinly sliced green onions

3/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Green onion (optional)

Preheat oven to 400°.

Combine the first 5 ingredients in a large bowl, tossing mixture to coat. Place the potato mixture in a shallow roasting pan. Bake at 400° for 30 minutes or until tender, stirring mixture occasionally. Cool to room temperature. Combine the parsley, yogurt, green onions, salt, and black pepper in a large bowl. Add the cooled potato mixture, and toss gently. Serve salad at room temperature or chilled. Garnish with green onion, if desired.

Yield: 8 servings (serving size: 1 cup)

 
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Thank you Tess! I love garlic and these sound to yummy not to try.


Originally Posted by HarleyMom GarlicWhether roasted, baked, sautéed, or raw, garlic always excels

There are many ways to prepare this redolent bulb, each method resulting in a somewhat different flavor. True garlic aficionados can be divided into two camps: those who believe in using garlic presses, and those who claim pressing makes the oil bitter. But however you choose to prepare it, know this: The more you cook garlic, the less pungent it becomes. It's only when eaten raw that garlic gives you that burning sensation.

How healthy is garlic? Researchers still can't seem to agree on just how much garlic is a good thing. Or which form is best. Here's where the debate stands.

Heart disease: About the equivalent of a clove of garlic per day may be all that's needed to lower blood-cholesterol levels an average of 9 percent, according to a New York Medical College report. Most of the credit goes to allicin, which is released when garlic is crushed or chewed. Several other chemicals believed to help keep blood vessels more flexible and block artery-clogging plaque are also found in garlic, as is ajoene, a potent anticlotting agent. Caveat to all garlic-supplement-takers: A recent study concludes this form of garlic ingestion is not an effective cholesterol-buster.

Cancer: No clinical trials have tested garlic's cancer-fighting potential. But reports suggest a correlation between high quantities of garlic in the local diets of several countries to low occurrences of certain kinds of cancer.

Choose well: Always select large heads of garlic; peeling those tiny cloves isn't worth the effort. Professionals call these small cloves "seed garlic," and indeed, they can be sprouted and planted if you like purple spheres of flowerlets.

A good head of garlic should be very hard; soft ones can be rotten or contain moldy spots, which spread very quickly through the cloves. The "paper" on a garlic head can be white or shot through with blue veins. This doesn't affect the taste, although in some places, blue garlic is cheaper.

Peeling garlic: A "head" of garlic is typically made up of 10 to 12 individual cloves. To peel a garlic clove, place a heavy-duty or chef's knife on top of the clove. Hit the flat side of the knife with the palm of your hand; this will slightly smash the clove, separating the peel from the garlic. Then the peel should easily slip away from the clove.

Roasting garlic: Roasting garlic in the oven mellows it into a slightly sweet, nutty spread that has the consistency of butter. Spread it on French bread for an appetizer or add it to dips, spreads, mashed potatoes, sauces, and soups. To roast garlic, remove the white papery skin from the garlic head (do not peel or separate cloves). Wrap each head separately in aluminum foil. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes to 1 hour; let cool 10 minutes. Then separate the cloves, and squeeze to extract pulp.

Browning garlic: This brings out its earthy nuttiness and is a way to jazz up plain vegetables. When preparing garlic, however, be careful because it burns quickly. To brown garlic, heat 1-1/2 teaspoons oil in a nonstick skillet. Add 4 large chopped garlic cloves; saute 3 minutes or until browned and toss with most any vegetable. Browned garlic is particularly good with potatoes, asparagus, artichokes, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts.

Stopping the sprouts: Garlic starts to go bad when it sprouts, turning the taste bitter. Once it's in your house, it'll start sprouting if it hasn't already. To delay this process, store garlic in a dark, cool, dry place if you've bought more than you'll use in a week. Those big braids of garlic heads you sometimes find make lovely decorations, but it's rare to make your way to the end of one before it goes bad.

 
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Originally Posted by Diane Thank you Tess! I love garlic and these sound to yummy not to try.
You're welcome Diane
, I love to roast Elephant garlic in the oven with olive oil, makes a delicious spread for french bread and crackers.
 
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Ya i wanna say thanks too! I LOVE garlic. Gonna print these off & show em to my mom!

 
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Originally Posted by Laura Ya i wanna say thanks too! I LOVE garlic. Gonna print these off & show em to my mom! We love garlic too -- it's a staple in our house, and the only fresh herb that we buy on a regular basis!
 
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*bUrP* Ew, that stinks!


I LOVE garlic. Thanks for the recipes. I'll try 'em during Spring Break! Yum.....


 
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Artichokes Stuffed with Smashed Potatoes and Browned Garlic <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0 xmlns:fo="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Format"><TBODY><TR><TD>
</TD></TR><TR><TD colSpan=2>From Cooking Light</TD></TR><TR><TD>
</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>


4 large artichokes

1 1/2 pounds baking potatoes, cut into 1/2-inch cubes

2 tablespoons olive oil

6 garlic cloves, minced

1/4 cup dry sherry

3/4 cup (3 ounces) shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese

1/2 cup chopped fresh basil

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon pepper

1 tablespoon shredded fresh Parmesan cheese

Cooking spray

Fresh parsley sprigs (optional)

Working with 1 artichoke at a time, cut off stem to the base. Remove bottom leaves and tough outer leaves, leaving tender heart and bottom; trim about 2 inches from the top of artichoke. Steam artichokes, covered, 20 minutes; cool to room temperature. Gently spread leaves; remove fuzzy thistle from bottom with a spoon.

Preheat oven to 375°.

Place potatoes in a saucepan; cover with water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat. Simmer 12 minutes or until tender; drain. Beat at medium speed of a mixer or with a potato masher until coarsely mashed.

Heat oil in a nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add garlic; sauté 2 minutes or until golden. Remove from heat; add sherry, scraping skillet to loosen browned bits. Add sherry mixture, mozzarella, basil, salt, and pepper to potatoes. Stuff about 1 cup potato mixture into each artichoke. Sprinkle with Parmesan. Place stuffed artichokes in an 8-inch square baking dish coated with cooking spray. Bake at 375° for 20 minutes or until artichokes are tender. Garnish with parsley, if desired.

Yield: 4 servings

 
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Hi HarleyMom! I am new her and I am so looking forward to this section of MUT! I love to create and cook. I also love getting recipes and trying them out. I will definitely try these. Thanks!
 
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WOW Thanks for those recipies HarleyMom! I Love garlic too and i eat a raw clove every day at the first sign of a sniffle! I also add garlic to a lot of my cooking as it's great to clean the blood. I know it smells strong but i love it.

I am always sneeking 'more' into the dish.


 
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OH MY! I Love garlic!

Garlic on everything!

You can never have too much garlic in a spagetti sauce (gravy).



 
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Harleymom,

I just love garlic, and cook with it just about everyday! Thanks for the info and the recipes! Yum!

Originally Posted by HarleyMom GarlicWhether roasted, baked, sautéed, or raw, garlic always excels

There are many ways to prepare this redolent bulb, each method resulting in a somewhat different flavor. True garlic aficionados can be divided into two camps: those who believe in using garlic presses, and those who claim pressing makes the oil bitter. But however you choose to prepare it, know this: The more you cook garlic, the less pungent it becomes. It's only when eaten raw that garlic gives you that burning sensation.

How healthy is garlic? Researchers still can't seem to agree on just how much garlic is a good thing. Or which form is best. Here's where the debate stands.

Heart disease: About the equivalent of a clove of garlic per day may be all that's needed to lower blood-cholesterol levels an average of 9 percent, according to a New York Medical College report. Most of the credit goes to allicin, which is released when garlic is crushed or chewed. Several other chemicals believed to help keep blood vessels more flexible and block artery-clogging plaque are also found in garlic, as is ajoene, a potent anticlotting agent. Caveat to all garlic-supplement-takers: A recent study concludes this form of garlic ingestion is not an effective cholesterol-buster.

Cancer: No clinical trials have tested garlic's cancer-fighting potential. But reports suggest a correlation between high quantities of garlic in the local diets of several countries to low occurrences of certain kinds of cancer.

Choose well: Always select large heads of garlic; peeling those tiny cloves isn't worth the effort. Professionals call these small cloves "seed garlic," and indeed, they can be sprouted and planted if you like purple spheres of flowerlets.

A good head of garlic should be very hard; soft ones can be rotten or contain moldy spots, which spread very quickly through the cloves. The "paper" on a garlic head can be white or shot through with blue veins. This doesn't affect the taste, although in some places, blue garlic is cheaper.

Peeling garlic: A "head" of garlic is typically made up of 10 to 12 individual cloves. To peel a garlic clove, place a heavy-duty or chef's knife on top of the clove. Hit the flat side of the knife with the palm of your hand; this will slightly smash the clove, separating the peel from the garlic. Then the peel should easily slip away from the clove.

Roasting garlic: Roasting garlic in the oven mellows it into a slightly sweet, nutty spread that has the consistency of butter. Spread it on French bread for an appetizer or add it to dips, spreads, mashed potatoes, sauces, and soups. To roast garlic, remove the white papery skin from the garlic head (do not peel or separate cloves). Wrap each head separately in aluminum foil. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes to 1 hour; let cool 10 minutes. Then separate the cloves, and squeeze to extract pulp.

Browning garlic: This brings out its earthy nuttiness and is a way to jazz up plain vegetables. When preparing garlic, however, be careful because it burns quickly. To brown garlic, heat 1-1/2 teaspoons oil in a nonstick skillet. Add 4 large chopped garlic cloves; saute 3 minutes or until browned and toss with most any vegetable. Browned garlic is particularly good with potatoes, asparagus, artichokes, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts.

Stopping the sprouts: Garlic starts to go bad when it sprouts, turning the taste bitter. Once it's in your house, it'll start sprouting if it hasn't already. To delay this process, store garlic in a dark, cool, dry place if you've bought more than you'll use in a week. Those big braids of garlic heads you sometimes find make lovely decorations, but it's rare to make your way to the end of one before it goes bad.

 
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I love Garlic too!

I always cook with garlic everyday at home. People in my house not really fond with garlic.

But who cares, I love garlic and it's good for body.

Recently, people in Japan consume Garlic pills to increase their power for dailies activities.

Thanks for the info and great recipes.

 
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I soo love garlic! I had garlic coming out of my pores for 2 days with this recipe....totally worth it!!! A must try from allrecipes.com:

Amy's Garlic Egg Chicken

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 egg yolk
  • 6 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves
  • 6 tablespoons butter
  • 1 cup dry bread crumbs
  • 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1 tablespoon dried parsley
  • 1 tablespoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 tablespoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon ground black pepper
<HR class=hr1>DIRECTIONS:
[*]In a glass dish, beat egg yolk with garlic. Place chicken in egg mixture, and turn to coat. Cover dish and refrigerate for at least 4 hours, or overnight if possible.

[*]Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C).

[*]Melt butter and pour into the bottom of a 9x13 inch baking dish. Mix together the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, parsley, garlic powder, salt and pepper. Dip marinated chicken in crumb mixture. Place coated chicken in baking dish, and pour remaining egg mixture over.

[*]Bake in preheated oven for 15 to 20 minutes on each side, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear.

Originally Posted by HarleyMom GarlicWhether roasted, baked, sautéed, or raw, garlic always excels

There are many ways to prepare this redolent bulb, each method resulting in a somewhat different flavor. True garlic aficionados can be divided into two camps: those who believe in using garlic presses, and those who claim pressing makes the oil bitter. But however you choose to prepare it, know this: The more you cook garlic, the less pungent it becomes. It's only when eaten raw that garlic gives you that burning sensation.

How healthy is garlic? Researchers still can't seem to agree on just how much garlic is a good thing. Or which form is best. Here's where the debate stands.

Heart disease: About the equivalent of a clove of garlic per day may be all that's needed to lower blood-cholesterol levels an average of 9 percent, according to a New York Medical College report. Most of the credit goes to allicin, which is released when garlic is crushed or chewed. Several other chemicals believed to help keep blood vessels more flexible and block artery-clogging plaque are also found in garlic, as is ajoene, a potent anticlotting agent. Caveat to all garlic-supplement-takers: A recent study concludes this form of garlic ingestion is not an effective cholesterol-buster.

Cancer: No clinical trials have tested garlic's cancer-fighting potential. But reports suggest a correlation between high quantities of garlic in the local diets of several countries to low occurrences of certain kinds of cancer.

Choose well: Always select large heads of garlic; peeling those tiny cloves isn't worth the effort. Professionals call these small cloves "seed garlic," and indeed, they can be sprouted and planted if you like purple spheres of flowerlets.

A good head of garlic should be very hard; soft ones can be rotten or contain moldy spots, which spread very quickly through the cloves. The "paper" on a garlic head can be white or shot through with blue veins. This doesn't affect the taste, although in some places, blue garlic is cheaper.

Peeling garlic: A "head" of garlic is typically made up of 10 to 12 individual cloves. To peel a garlic clove, place a heavy-duty or chef's knife on top of the clove. Hit the flat side of the knife with the palm of your hand; this will slightly smash the clove, separating the peel from the garlic. Then the peel should easily slip away from the clove.

Roasting garlic: Roasting garlic in the oven mellows it into a slightly sweet, nutty spread that has the consistency of butter. Spread it on French bread for an appetizer or add it to dips, spreads, mashed potatoes, sauces, and soups. To roast garlic, remove the white papery skin from the garlic head (do not peel or separate cloves). Wrap each head separately in aluminum foil. Bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes to 1 hour; let cool 10 minutes. Then separate the cloves, and squeeze to extract pulp.

Browning garlic: This brings out its earthy nuttiness and is a way to jazz up plain vegetables. When preparing garlic, however, be careful because it burns quickly. To brown garlic, heat 1-1/2 teaspoons oil in a nonstick skillet. Add 4 large chopped garlic cloves; saute 3 minutes or until browned and toss with most any vegetable. Browned garlic is particularly good with potatoes, asparagus, artichokes, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts.

Stopping the sprouts: Garlic starts to go bad when it sprouts, turning the taste bitter. Once it's in your house, it'll start sprouting if it hasn't already. To delay this process, store garlic in a dark, cool, dry place if you've bought more than you'll use in a week. Those big braids of garlic heads you sometimes find make lovely decorations, but it's rare to make your way to the end of one before it goes bad.

 
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Tonight I am making a chicken spinach alfredo pizza. Evil but sooooo yummy

Sautee a chicken breast (cut into thin slices) in tons of crushed garlic, 1/2 onion, olive oil and butter. Add italian seasoning, pepper, cayenne, bit of seasoning salt. Add just a bit of cream or milk then 2 cups fresh sliced spinach. Put this all on a pizza crust (I just buy the dough) and then top with parmesan and mozza cheese. Pretty easy and sooooooo tasty


 

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